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installation in 2009, plots were planted with 225 ft 2 of locally grown kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis ) sod and 75 ft 2 of additional ornamental plants, including burning bush ( Euonymus alatus ), blue fescue ( Festuca glauca ), littleleaf boxwood

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research was to determine whether incorporating soil amendments or topdressing with compost would improve spring establishment as measured by vegetative cover and density of either a mix of kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis ) and perennial ryegrass

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Drain tile installation into a native-soil athletic field and subsequent sand topdressing applications are cost-effective alternatives to complete field renovation. However, if cumulative topdressing rates exceed root system development, surface stability may be compromised. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of cumulative topdressing, over a compacted sandy loam soil, on the fall wear tolerance and surface shear strength of a kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis)–perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) stand. Research was initiated in East Lansing, MI, on 10 Apr. 2007. A well-graded, high-sand-content root zone (90.0% sand, 7.0% silt, and 3.0% clay) was topdressed at a 0.25-inch depth [2.0 lb/ft2 (dry weight)] per application, providing cumulative topdressing depths of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 inches applied from 11 July to 15 Aug. 2007. Fall traffic was applied twice weekly to all treatments from 10 Oct. to 3 Nov. 2007. In 2008, topdressing applications and traffic, as described earlier, were repeated on the same experimental plots. Results obtained from this research suggest that the 0.5-inch topdressing depth applied over a 5-week period in the summer will provide improved shoot density and surface shear strength in the subsequent fall. Results also suggest that topdressing rates as thick as 4.0 inches accumulated over a 2-year period will provide increased shoot density, but diminished surface shear strength.

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of ethephon treatment of drought resistance of Kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis. L). Beijing For. Univ., Beijing, China, Master’s Diss Hare, P.D. Cress, W.A. van Staden, J. 1999 Proline synthesis and degradation: A model system for elucidating

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turfgrasses for wear tolerance using a wear simulator Intl. Turfgrass Soc. Res. J. 9 137 145 Bourgoin, B. Mansat, P. AitTaleb, B. Quaggag, M.H. 1985 Explicative characteristics of treading tolerance in Festuca rubra , Lolium perenne , and Poa pratensis 235

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Doorenbos, J. Pruitt, W.O. 1977 Crop water requirements. FAO Irr. Drainage Paper 24 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Rome Greipsson, S. 1999 Seed coating improves establishment of surface seeded Poa pratensis used in revegetation

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30 mm decreased turfgrass cover, ball deceleration, and traction. Rogers and Waddington (1992) reported that kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis ) cutting height did not change the GMAX with a Clegg impact soil tester (CIST; Turf Tec, Tallahassee, FL

Open Access

percentage of turfgrass type by golf course feature. Turfgrass types included creeping bentgrass ( Agrostis stolonifera ), Kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis ), annual bluegrass ( Poa annua ), perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne ), tall fescue ( Festuca

Open Access

.M. Sender, D. 1999 Tree leaf decomposition effects on kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis L.) J. Turfgrass Mgt. 3 69 74 Nikolai, T.A. Rieke, P.E. McVay, N.T. 1998 Leaf mulch forum “research and real-world techniques.” 68th Ann. Michigan Turfgrass Conf. Proc

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a 1- to 9-scale, where 9 is no injury or reduction in establishment and 1 is no establishment or all bleached tissue. There were also tall fescue ( Festuca arundinacea ) and kentucky bluegrass ( Poa pratensis ) cultivars included in our study to

Open Access