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Chinese hibiscus ( Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L.) or tropical hibiscus is extensively planted as a flowering pot plant worldwide and as a flowering shrub throughout tropical regions. Hibiscus rosa-sinensis has not been reported from the wild and is

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Abstract

Mefluidide was applied as a foliar spray to the point of runoff to plants of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. ‘Pink Versicolor’ at 0, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 8000 mg/liter. Mefluidide treatment increased lateral branching, but inhibited the length of lateral growth and plant height as compared to untreated controls. Tip necrosis of young, expanding leaves was seen at the lowest mefluidide concentration, and increased to the point of severe defoliation of plants at the highest concentration. Mefluidide delayed flowering, but increased the number of flower buds produced. In a 2nd experiment, single and double spray applications of 0, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg/liter mefluidide were evaluated in comparison to hand-pinching the plants. Both pinching and mefluidide application increased the number of lateral shoots, compared to an untreated control. In contrast to pinched plants, mefluidide treatment inhibited the average length of the lateral shoots. Double applications of mefluidide inhibited plant height, lateral shoot number, and shoot length, as compared to single applications. Treatment with 10 mg/liter gibberellic acid following mefluidide applications was ineffective in reversing the effects of mefluidide on hibiscus growth. Chemical name used: N-[2,4-dimethyl-5-[[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]amino]phenyl]acetamide (mefluidide).

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Abstract

Succinic acid-2,2-dimethylhydrazide (SADH) was ineffective but (2-chloroethyl)trimethylammonium chloride (chlormequat) and α-cyclopropyl-α-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-pyrimidinemethanol (ancymidol) retarded growth of several cultivars of the Chinese hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Linn.) inducing shorter internodes and more and earlier flowering during summer months. (2-Chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) also reduced the length of terminal snoots, but reduced flowering and stimulated the growth of lower axillary shoots of unpruned plants.

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Abstract

Dark storage of Chinese hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. cv. Brilliant Red) for 5 days to simulate shipping promoted flower bud abscission. Less developed flower buds (<30 mm) were more susceptible than developed buds to dark-storage-induced abscission. Removal of mature buds (>30 mm) before dark storage reduced subsequent abscission of younger, less developed buds. Plants grown under low irradiance conditions (500 µmol·s–1·m–2 PPF) abscised more flower buds in response to dark storage than those grown in high irradiance (980 µmol·s–1·m–2 PPF). These results indicate factors that decrease the availability and partitioning of photosynthates to immature flower buds increase the incidence of abscission.

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Tropical hibiscus ( Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L.), also commonly known as the shoe flower or chinese hibiscus, is a widely planted tropical flowering shrub throughout the world. This cultivated species is generally a highly heterozygous polyploid of

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. Discussion The effect of exogenous application of hormones on the level of endogenous hormones is complex because there was positive or negative feedback regulation. The results obtained in Chinese Hibiscus ( Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ) at 100 μM treated for 6 h

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drought-stressed conditions in Chinese hibiscus ( Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L.). In another study on ponderosa pine ( Pinus ponderosa Dougl.) and big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata Nutt.), plants grown under drought had greater WUE than those under well

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a substantial sink for these nutrients. Whether these elements were similarly recycled from senescing flowers is not known. Concentrations of N, P, K, and Mg notably decreased in senescing flowers of chinese hibiscus ( H. rosa-sinensis ) which are

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in color or growth of unfertilized areca palm [ Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf.] or Chinese hibiscus ( Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. ‘President’) plants when compared with plants fertilized with a complete fertilizer with

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