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Abstract

Two clones of Vaccinium showed high field-resistance to Phytophthora cinnamomi and remained unaffected during 3 years of observation in naturally infested soil: Me-US 32, a productive, cultivated highbush selection (V. australe), and a selection from the wild of the diploid species (V. atrococcum). However, the clone, E-22 selection of V. australe, growing in adjacent row to the resistant clones was severely damaged by the pathogen. Phytophthora cinnamomi was readily isolated from soil surrounding both resistant and susceptible clones.

Open Access

Abstract

Adaptation to upland soils was investigated in a diallel study involving progeny of 4 blueberry (Vactinium) clones consisting of 1 highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum L.) clone and 3 interspecific hybrids. Both general and specific combining ability were significant. Seedling progenies of NJUS 11 (V. ashei × V. atrococcum) and US75 (V. darrowi × V. corymbosum) grew well on an upland soil. Although not included in the diallel crosses, NJUS 64 (V. myrsinites × V. angustifolium) progenies also grew well on upland soil.

Open Access

Abstract

A clone of the diploid blueberry species Vaccinium atrococcum Heller, was previously found to be highly resistant to the fungus tetraploid highbusy blueberry. The tetraploid V. atrococcum was highly root-rot resistant in a greenhouse study. It was crossed with ‘Earliblue’ and 85 seedlings were obtained. In general, the seedlings were fertile, had small, dark fruit with mild flavor, good scars and quite soft flesh consistency.

Blueberry selections Me-US 32 and Michigan Lowbush 1, and cultivars ‘Berkeley’, ‘Bluecrop’, ‘Earliblue’, and ‘Dixi’ were screened in the greenhouse for resistance to P. cinnamomi. Michigan Lowbush 1 was highly resistant to the root-rot fungus. Me-US 32 was resistant, but all the cultivars were susceptible. Michigan Lowbush 1 is a grandparent and probably the source of resistance of Me-US 32.

Open Access

’s (1980) taxonomic treatment,” which would include Camp’s V. atrococcum , V. elliottii , and other diploid highbush taxa. The recessed stigma of V. elliottii has been noted previously ( Lyrene, 1994 ; Sampson et al., 2013 ; Vander Kloet, 1998

Open Access