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Joseph P. Albano, James Altland, Donald J. Merhaut, Sandra B. Wilson and P. Chris Wilson

orientation on the bench throughout the study ( Fig. 3A ). Osmocote 19–6–12 (N–P–K) (Scotts-Sierra Horticultural Products Co., Marysville, OH) was applied to the substrate surface at the rate of 13 g/pot on day 58 of the study. Fig. 2. Greenhouse temperature

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Anthony S. Davis, Matthew M. Aghai, Jeremiah R. Pinto and Kent G. Apostol

same amount of N, 10.8 kg of 5–10–10 controlled-release fertilizer (N–P–K) were hand-mixed into 474 L of growing medium, yielding 4.59 g of the fertilizer per cell (229 mg of N per plant). The fertilizer (Morcrop; Lilly Miller Brands, Walnut Creek, CA

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Nihat Guner, Luis A. Rivera-Burgos and Todd C. Wehner

.02 M phosphate buffer ( Fig. 1 ), pH 7.0. The leaf to buffer ratio was 1:5 (1 g infected leaf to 5 mL buffer). Fig. 1. Infected ‘Gray Zucchini’ leaves used to maintain and increase inoculum for the inheritance study. To maintain the ZYMV-FL isolate and

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Nihat Guner, Zvezdana Pesic-VanEsbroeck, Luis A. Rivera-Burgos and Todd C. Wehner

Zucchini’ leaves using a mortar and pestle in 0.02 m phosphate buffer, pH 7.0. Leaf to buffer ratio was 1:5 (1 g infected leaf to 5 mL buffer). To maintain the PRSV-W isolate and increase inoculum, we used the rub method ( Guner et al., 2002 ). Squash

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Steven F. Vaughn, Mark A. Berhow and Brent Tisserat

× 160-mm length) containing 10 g of a soilless potting medium formulated with 1 peatmoss : 1 vermiculite (by volume) and amended with 10.9 g·kg −1 Micromax (Scotts Co., Marysville, OH) and 62.3 g·kg −1 Osmocote (14% to 6% to 12% N–P–K; Scotts Co.). 3

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Andrew L. Thomas, Jackie L. Harris, Elijah A. Bergmeier and R. Keith Striegler

fall into two categories, with the shared goal of producing maximal amounts of leaf area and developing a vigorous root system. Depending on site characteristics and other factors, some growers allow new vines to sprawl with little training the initial

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Jongtae Lee, Jinseong Moon, Heedae Kim, Injong Ha and Sangdae Lee

leaves followed by measuring fresh leaf weight (g/plant) and bulb weight (g/plant) on the individual plot's basis. The samples at harvest were dried to constant weight at 70 °C. The dried samples were ground, weighed, and dissolved in H 2 SO 4 and H 2 O

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Chen Xingwei, Thohirah Lee Abdullah, Sima Taheri, Nur Ashikin Psyquay Abdullah and Siti Aishah Hassan

and 4:00 pm daily. Complex fertilizer NPK Blue (12:12:17 + 2Mg+TE) included nitrogen (12%), phosphorous (5.2%), potassium (14.1%), magnesium (1.2%), and trace elements (TE) such as iron, zinc, boron, copper, and manganese were applied monthly at 5 g

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Melisa Crane, Todd C. Wehner and Rachel P. Naegele

were 1.5 m apart (center to center). Fertilizer consisted of 90–39–74 kg·ha −1 (N–P–K) broadcast preplant and 34–0–0 kg·ha −1 (N–P–K) side dressed at the two to four leaf stage. Curbit (active ingredient Ethalfluralin) (Loveland Products, Inc

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Kelly T. Morgan, Robert E. Rouse and Robert C. Ebel

nutrient applications was considered by applying macro- and micronutrients in selected combinations at three rates. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of foliar nutrient applications on disease incidence, leaf nutrient concentrations