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The primary period of shoot extension growth on field-grown peach trees occurs in the evening. Field measurements indicate a 2-3 fold increase in growth rate occurs in the late afternoon and lasts for about 2 hours. The daily growth pattern is correlated with trends in temperature, water potential and carbohydrate concentrations. Early morning and late night growth rates are apparently limited by low temperatures. Heating shoot tips at these times causes extension rate to increase greatly above that of controls at ambient temperature. The afternoon surge in extension growth rate is correlated with recovering stem water potentials. Artificially increasing stem water potential at mid-day by reducing transpiration causes extension rates to dramatically increase 2-3 fold. Starch is accumulated in the shoot extension zone during the day and depleted during the evening surge in growth.

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136 ORAL SESSION (Abstr. 651-657) CROSS-COMMODITY COMPUTERS/EXTENSION

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Cultivar selection is one method used for the conservation of irrigation water. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate the evapotranspiration (ET) rates of 24 well-watered, turf-type bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) genotypes under field conditions and established on a fritted clay root zone contained in plastic minilysimeter pots. A secondary objective was to correlate ET rate to leaf extension rate, a potential rapidly assessed predictor of the amount of leaf surface area present for ET. ET rates were determined by the water-balance method. Both the overall ET and leaf extension rate differed significantly among genotypes. ET rates were not correlated with leaf extension rates in individual years. Our data indicated a potential for water savings based on bermudagrass cultivar selection that was similar to the reported potential water savings based on warm-season turfgrass species selection.

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1 Extension Horticulturist. 2 Extension Home Economist. Appreciation is expressed to the following in working on the CEVIS project: Robert Gammill, professor, computer science and electrical engineering David Rice, extension computer

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This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of artificial light sources for light period extension on growth and flowering of statice `Sophia' and `Early Blue'. The seeds were sown on 10 June in a plug tray with 128 plugs. The seedlings were grown at the highland (800 m above sea level) for 50 days, and transplanted on 30 July in 20-cm-diameter plastic pots. High-pressure sodium lamps (HPS) (220V, 400W), incandescent lamps (Il) (220V, 200W), and fluorescent lamps (Fl) (220V, 40W) for day length extension (16-h photoperiod) as compared with short day (8-h photoperiod) were tested. HPS gave the greatest photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), but Fl did the smallest. HPS or Fl as compared with Il showed high ratio of red/far-red light. The leaves of plant grown under HPS were effective for light absorbance and chlorophyll contents. HPS promoted photosynthesis as much as light period extension, while more respiration than photosynthesis occurred under Fl affected by low PAR. Long day condition as light period extension hastened flowering of statice, and HPS or Il were more effective than Fl on flowering among artificial light sources tested. The light compensation and saturation points of statice were 50 and 500 μmol·m–2·s–1, respectively. Photosynthesis hastened at high temperature, but amount of photosynthesis at vegetative stage showed much higher than flowering stage under the condition below 20 °C These results indicated that day length extension with HPS increased productivity and quality for cut flower of statice at the highland in Korea.

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Heflebower, R 2008 Constructing a low-cost high tunnel Utah State Univ. Coop. Ext. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1296&context=extension_curall . [accessed 5 Jul 2020] Black, BL Maughan, T Nolasco, C Christensen, B

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Trials were conducted in California to evaluate techniques to extend post-harvest life of Western shipper-type muskmelon cultivars (Cusumis melo L.). The use of .025 mm polyethylene bags, either as individual melon wraps or as liners for 18 kg commercial cartons, minimized water loss and associated softening of the fruit. A three minute dip in 58-60°C water effectively checked surface mold and decay. The combination of hot water dip and polyethylene carton liner maintained high quality marketable fruit for at least 30 days of cold storage at 2-4°C. This technique would require only modest changes in commercial handling practices, with minimal additional per carton cost. Commercial utilization of this technique could stimulate the export of California muskmelons to Pacific Rim countries.

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In this article, we make a short review of cooling techniques for high tunnels in tropical regions and share the experience of training bell pepper growers and extension personnel from the Dominican Republic regions of San José de Ocoa and Constanza

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In response to a national increase in the consumption of triploid (seedless) watermelons, seedless watermelon production in Delaware has increased to 43% of the total watermelon acreage. Cultural practices for triploid watermelon production are similar to seeded (diploid) types. However, poor seed germination, high seed costs, erratic performance, and inadequate varieties limited their adoption until the early 1990s in Delaware. Univ. of Delaware Cooperative Extension has worked with Delaware growers to develop a “recipe” for successful triploid production. Extension programs, such as on-farm demonstrations, research trials, educational seminars, and one-on-one consultations, have enabled producers to provide high-quality fruit and yields. Intensive management and marketing are the keys tosuccess as Delaware producers have become leaders of triploid production in the Northeast region. As demand for triploid watermelon continues to increase, extension will remain a vital part of the $4.5 million industry. Growers continually deal with marketing issues in a supply and demand-driven market. As more seedless are on the market and profits lessen, growers will have to be diligent in their marketing and management practices.

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