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Abstract

Six cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) cultivars, (water harvested under New Jersey growing conditions) were evaluated for their suitability for fresh market sale. Fruit were hand-picked and water-reel picked, held in the bog flood water for 0-, 4-, 8-, 12-, and 24-hr periods, and then stored for 12 weeks at 3°C. After an additional 4 days at 21° storage the fruit were evaluated for fungal fruit rot and physiological breakdown (PB). ‘Franklin’, ‘Pilgrim’, and ‘Stevens’ were superior to ‘Early Black’ and ‘Wilcox’ as measured by occurrence of rot and PB. Water immersion time had a greater influence on PB than on rot. As time in the water increased, the percentage of fruit manifesting PB increased, with ‘Ben Lear’ developing the least and ‘Early Black’ and ‘Wilcox’ the most PB.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.), individually wrapped in plastic film or nonwrapped, were held 7, 14, or 21 days at 1°, 4°, or 7°C plus an additional 5 days at 15° to evaluate the effect of film wrapping on chilling injury. Film wrapping did not reduce the incidence of visible chilling injury on either pericarp or seeds. Chilling injury was progressively more severe the lower the storage temperature.

Open Access

Several intermittent 13C warming treatments were applied to `Primofiori' lemons (Citrus limon Burn) stored at 2 or SC. Fruit stored at 13C were treated with 10%, 2090, or 30% CO2 for 24 hours at weekly intervals. Reduction in decay and physiological disorders was best with two cycles of 2 weeks at 2C and 2 weeks at 13C and relative humidity >95 %. Under this storage condition, soluble solids concentration, pH, titratable acidity, and reducing sugars did not change relative to values at harvest, but the concentration of ascorbic acid increased and that of nonreducing sugars decreased in relation to harvest values. Carbon dioxide treatments did not prevent the development of alternaria (Alternaria citri Ell. & Pierce) rot and red blotch disorder, but effectively prevented the development of membranosis, rind pitting, and oleocellosis.

Free access
Authors: and

Five members of the Proteaceae and 13 Australian native cut flower cultivars were stored for 35 days under standard conditions at 1C to assess their ability to withstand long-term storage and transport. Protea cynaroides L., Leucadendron `Silvan Red', Leucospermum `Firewheel', Thryptomene calycina (Lindl.) Stapf., Telopea speciosissima R. Br., and Verticordia grandtiflora Endl. retained a vase life of at least 7 days after 21 days of storage. Leucospermum cordifolium Salisb. ex Knight, Protea neriifoli R. Br., Chamelaucium uncinatum `Alba', C. uncinatum `Purple Pride', Verticordia monadelpha Turcz., Verticordia plumosa (Desf.) Druce, and Verticordia nitens (Lindl.) Schau. suffered a decline in vase life ranging from 31% to 100% after 14 to 21 days of storage. Species of Verticordia and Chamelaucium were particularly susceptible to fungal infection. Anigozanthos pulcherrimus Hook. and the Anigozanthos cultivars Ruby Delight, Bush Harmony, Bush Haze, and Gold Fever all showed a significant reduction in vase life after 14 days of storage compared with unstored controls.

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Authors: and

Abstract

In a germination test with strawberry seed of different ages stored at 40°F, 23-year-old seed germinated as well as 1-year-old seed. Germination was relatively high for all of the seed lots, despite differences in age.

Open Access

Abstract

Incorporation of thiabendazole (TBZ) in the wax coating applied to grapefruit significantly reduced the amount of low temp pitting which developed during prolonged storage at 8 and 12°C.

Open Access
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Abstract

An inexpensive method for accurate control and measurement of fresh air introduction into experimental storage rooms is described.

Open Access

`Columbia' and `Gebhard' strains of red `d'Anjou' pears (Pyrus Communis L.) harvested at similar maturity exhibited different ripening behavior after monthly removal from 1C storage in air. `Columbia' fruit produced ethylene at higher rates than `Gebhard' fruit during 15 days of ripening at 20C after each corresponding storage interval, `Gebhard' fruit required a longer period of chilling than `Columbia' fruit to generate noticeable rates of ethylene during ripening. The unripened fruit of both strains contained similar amounts of ACC at each corresponding storage interval. At each corresponding ripened state, ACC content in `Columbia' fruit increased 2 to 3-fold, while that in `Gebhard' fruit changed very little. After sufficient chilling, `Columbia' fruit were capable of softening to proper ripeness, and they developed buttery and juicy texture as indicated by the apparent reduction of extractable juice (EJ) content. `Gebhard' fruit also softened but to a lesser extent than `Columbia' fruit. Ripened `Gebhard' fruit had only slightly lower levels of EJ than unripened fruit and did not develop a buttery and juicy texture after any storage intervals. Titratable acidity (TA) in fruit of both strains varied between for the 1988 and 1989 seasons but decreased significantly during storage in both years. Soluble solids concentrations (SSC) in both strains also varied seasonally but did not change during storage or ripening. Chemical name used: 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC).

Free access

Abstract

Ripening of ‘Bartlett’ pears at 20°C was assessed in samples harvested weekly beginning 4 weeks prior to commercial harvest maturity. Ripening was promoted by delaying harvest, by 1- and 2-week periods of storage at 4.4°C, or both. Early summer treatments with 750 and 7500 ppm succinic acid-2,2-dimethylhydrazide (SADH) delayed ripening but this effect was counteracted by both delayed harvest and postharvest storage at 4.4°C. It is concluded that SADH delays ripening by influencing an endogenous mechanism for controlling ripening in pears.

Open Access

Experiments were conducted to determine if ethylene influences chilling injury, as measured by percentage of slices exhibiting water-soaked areas in fresh-cut tomato slices of `Mountain Pride' and `Sunbeam' tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Ethylene concentration in containers without ventilation significantly increased during storage at 5 °C, whereas little or no accumulation of ethylene occurred in containers with one or six perforations. Chilling injury was greatest for slices in containers with six perforations, compared to slices in containers with one perforation, and was over 13-fold greater than that of slices in control containers with no perforations. An experiment was also performed to investigate the effectiveness of including an ethylene absorbent pad in containers on subsequent ethylene accumulation and chilling injury. While ethylene in the no-pad controls increased continually during storage of both `Mountain Pride' and `Sunbeam' tomatoes at 5 °C under modified atmosphere conditions, no increase in accumulation of ethylene was observed in containers containing ethylene absorbent pads throughout storage. The ethylene absorbent pad treatment resulted in a significantly higher percentage of chilling injury compared with the no-pad control. In studies aimed at inhibiting ethylene production using AVG during storage of slices, the concentration of ethylene in control containers (no AVG) remained at elevated levels throughout storage, compared to containers with slices treated with AVG. Chilling injury in slices treated with AVG was 5-fold greater than that of controls. Further, we tested the effect of ethylene pretreatment of slices on subsequent slice shelf life and quality. In slices treated with ethylene (0, 0.1, 1, or 10 μL·L-1) immediately after slicing, ethylene production in nontreated controls was greater than that of all other ethylene pretreatments. However, pretreatment of slices 3 days after slicing resulted in a different pattern of ethylene production during storage. The rate of ethylene production by slices treated with 1 μL·L-1 ethylene 3 days after slicing was greater during storage than any of the other ethylene treatments. With slices pretreated with ethylene, both immediately and 3 days after slicing, the rate of ethylene production tended to show a negative correlation with chilling injury. Chemical name used: 1-aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG).

Free access