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Rafel Socias i Company, Ossama Kodad, José M. Alonso and Antonio J. Felipe

‘Mardía’ is a new almond cultivar released because of its good agronomical traits and very late blooming time, 2 weeks later than ‘Felisia’, the latest blooming cultivar released so far. It is characterized by its slightly upright growth habit, early ripening, high and regular bloom density, autogamy (S6Sf genotype), high fruit set, tolerance to diseases, hard shell, large kernel, very high content of oleic acid, and low content of linoleic acid.

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Luz M. Reyes, Orlando Martinez and Nubia Martinez

Variability of `chococito' maize cultivars (Zea mays L.), have been decreased in the Anchicaya river area, because new crops were established there. Process of recuperation, promotion, and conservation under in situ and ex situ conditions were proposed to the community of the area. Using participatory research methodologies, memory and uses were recuperated for four varieties through the Exchange Seed Interchange Fund (ESIF), established just for maize. The study was carried out in two components: social and agronomic. The social component was development in three phases: i) diagnosis; ii) establishment of the ESIF, and iii) socialization. The agronomic characterization was performed with members of the community through the development of the crop. Twenty-six variables, both quantitative and qualitative, were registered. The cultivars were appropriated for extreme conditions of the Anchicaya river area, high temperatures (30 °C) and high level of precipitation (6000 mm/year). During the process of cropping, it was found that the “to cut and to decay” system is the most common used in this region. Using multivariate analyses of quantitative and qualitative variables, the relationships between materials of `Chococito” race were found. The dendograms for these cultivars had shown differences among them. As a complement of the in situ conservation done by compromise of the Anchicaya's community, a duplicate under ex situ conditions was established at the Genetic Resources Laboratory, belonged to the Agronomy Dept. of National Univ. of Colombia.

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Graham J. King

The progress of the European Apple Genome Mapping Project will be described. Five populations segregating for a range of agronomic genes have been established in six European countries. Isozyme systems, RFLPs, RAPDs, and other PCR-based markers are being used to construct a unified genetic linkage map. Genotypic and phenotypic measurements have been precisely defined and standardized among participants. Phenotypic measurements for many agronomic traits are being replicated in different geographical locations over several years. Statistical and genetic analyses are aimed at defining components of genetic variation that account for “genes” manipulated by apple breeders. The segregation of fungal and insect resistance genes, tree habit, juvenility, budbreak, and many fruit characters has been scored. Markers have been identified linked to and flanking scab and mildew resistance genes. RAPD markers have been converted to codominant PCR-based markers for selection purposes. The JoinMap program has been extended for linkage analysis of crosses between heterozygous parents. A method for mapping QTLs in outcrossing species has been developed, together with software that is able to contend with dominant markers and missing data. Associated research is being carried out on the genetics and diversity of fungal resistance genes, fruit quality, and the socioeconomic aspects of apple production. The relational database, APPLE-STORE, has been designed and implemented for combined management of agronomic and genetic information. Synteny of linkage groups between Malus and Prunus has been established.

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Sara Serra, Rachel Leisso, Luca Giordani, Lee Kalcsits and Stefano Musacchi

, 2012 ). Thinning is a common agronomical practice to optimize crop load to improve fruit size and quality as well as reducing biennial bearing ( Dennis, 2000 ; Link, 2000 ; Wertheim, 2000 ). Thinning affects the cell number and fruit size ( Bain and

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John W. Wilcut, Charles H. Gilliam, Glenn R. Wehtje, T. Vint Hicks and Diane L. Berchielli

1 Assistant Professor of Weed Science, Dept. of Agronomy, Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Univ. of Georgia, Box 748, Tifton, GA 31793-0748. 2 Associate Professor, Dept. of Horticulture. 3 Associate Professor, Dept. of Agronomy and Soils. 4

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Yiwei Jiang and Robert N. Carrow

1 Postdoctroal research associate. Current address: Dept. of Agronomy, Purdue Univ., W. Lafayette, IN 47906-2054. 2 Professor; e-mail rcarrow@griffin.uga.edu . Funding from The Toro Company is gratefully acknowledged.

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P.D. Sternberg, A.L. Ulery and M. Villa-C

1 To whom requests for reprints should be addressed. Current address: Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture, NMSU, P.O. Box 30003, MSC 3Q, Las Cruces, NM 88001. E-mail address: aulery@nmsu.edu

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Judith Corte-Olivares, Gregory C. Phillips and S.A. Butler-Nance

1 Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture. 2 Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture. To whom reprint requests should be addressed. 3 Dept. of Experimental Statistics. Journal article no. 1469 of the New Mexico State Agr. Expt. Sta. We acknowledge

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Glenn R. Wehtje, Charles H. Gilliam and Ben F. Hajek

1 Associate Professor, Dept. of Agronomy and Soils. 2 Professor, Dept. of Horticulture. 3 Professor, Dept. of Agronomy and Soils. Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station Journal Series no. 11-923258. Use of trade names does not imply

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Tae-Jin Lee, Dermot P. Coyne, Thomas E. Clemente and Amitava Mitra

, Woodland, CA 95695. We also appreciate technical advice and assistance of Anne Vidaver, Patricia Lambrecht, Dan Higgins, Donn Ladd, Chonglie Ma, Dept. of Plant Pathology, Lisa Sutton, Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture, and Zhanyuan Zhang, Dept. of Agronomy