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://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mv036 > Wang, T. Cai, X. Zhang, J. Li, H. Ye, Z. 2010 The culture and early male sterile identification of distant hybrid embryos derived from Brassica oleracea var. capitata L. and male sterile line in B. juncea Yuan Yi Xue Bao 37 1661 1666 Yang, S

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sativum L.), bell pepper ‘California Wonder’ ( Capsicum annuum L.), rye ‘Wrens Abruzzi’ ( Secale cereale L.), collard ‘Georgia Southern’ ( Brassica oleracea L.), cowpea ‘Colossus’ ( Vigna unguiculata L.), crimson clover ‘Dixie Reseeding’ ( Trifolium

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,3-dichloropropene-chloropicrion (Telone C-35; Corteva AgriScience, Wilmington, DE) in Oct. 2015. Seed meal treatments [1:1 mixture Brassica juncea / Sinapis alba (Farm Fuel Inc., Santa Cruz, CA)] of 2.2, 4.4, and 6.6 t·ha −1 were applied the following spring in

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–2003 Northampton, MA Pradhan, A.K. Sodhi, Y.S. Mukeropandhyay, A. Pental, D. 1993 Heterosis breeding in Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea L.): Analysis of component characters contributing to heterosis for yield

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). MSMs are byproducts from crushing rape ( Brassica napus ), brown mustard ( Brassica juncea ), or white mustard ( Sinapis alba ) seeds for biodiesel production. MSMs have fungicidal, nematocidal, and herbicidal properties ( Borek et al., 1995 ; Hoagland

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. 2016 6 99 102 Zhang, XK Xiong, Q.F. Li, S.S. Zhang, X.Q. Zhang, G.S. 2012 Study on a new hybrid breeding between Raphanus sativus and Brassica juncea by distant hybridization Acta Agr. Jiangxi. 24 11 1 4 Supplemental Fig. 1. Flow chart of the

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) in tropical countries, such as India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Australia. Because of its AA genome, turnip is one of the ancestor species of Brassica juncea (2 n = 36, genome AABB) and Brassica napus (2 n = 38, genome AACC

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Sunn hemp, Crotalaria juncea L., is a warm-season legume that is planted before or after a vegetable cash crop to add nutrients and organic matter to the soil ( Cherr et al., 2006 , 2007 ; Mansoer et al., 1997 ; Wang et al., 2005 ). This cover

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in eastern Turkey. At the optimum economic B rate (OEBR), plant tissue B ranged from 42.5 to 50.2 mg·kg −1 B. Discussion The OEBRs in our study were higher than the 1.5 to 4.4 kg·ha −1 B rates obtained for mustard [ Brassica juncea (L.)] by

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( Amaranthus retroflexus L.) biomass was 72% to 93% lower and common lambsquarters biomass ( Chenopodium album L.) 87% to 99% less in soil amended with 1% to 3% (wt/wt) Oriental mustard [ Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.] seed meal relative to nontreated soil

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