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properties of pine bark substrates amended with parboiled rice hulls 70 weeks after planting in #5 containers with and without (fallow) spirea plants. Total porosity in the initial blends was greatest in substrates with 40% to 100% PBH and TP in those same

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application rate, but were affected by leaching fraction (LF) and P source. Tyler et al. (1996) decreased effluent P content by 58% when growing Skogholm cotoneaster ( Cotoneaster dammeri Schnied. ‘Skogholm’) in a pine bark substrate with a low (0.0 to 0

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not detect any plant pathogens (data not shown). The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory potential of three compost teas (pine bark, manure, and vermicasting), Root Rescue Landscape Powder ® (a mix of mycorrhizae and other

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. Discrepancies in the results could be attributed to the exclusion of some of the connected interparticle pores due to air entrapment and the hydrophobic tendencies of some organic components such as peat or pine bark ( Bunt, 1984 ; Fields et al., 2014

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; Mathers and Case, 2010 ). Richardson et al. (2008 ) reported that applying 3 inches of pine bark mini-nuggets controlled hairy bittercress ( Cardamine hirsuta ) in large (3–7 gal) containers up to 150 d. Additionally, Altland and Krause (2014 ) reported

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materials, such as sphagnum peat, wood fiber, and pine bark, may be difficult to accurately sort and characterize using sieve analysis. Considering the diversity of horticultural substrates, it may be beneficial if the protocols for sieve analysis reflect a

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for crop growth. Many mulch products have been recommended as a means of addressing weed control challenges in ornamental plant production ( Chalker-Scott, 2007 ). Richardson et al. (2008) reported over 5 months of weed control with pine bark nuggets

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Abstract

Pine bark-filled containers were subjected to 10°, 20°, 30°, or 40°C for 24 days and fertilized periodically with 210 ml of a solution containing 100 ppm NH4-N. Every 6 days, medium solutions were tested for NH4-N and NO3-N concentrations and a NO3-N accumulation rate (NAR) was determined. Medium solution NH4-N concentrations were lower at 20° and 30° than at 10° and 40°, while those at 40° were considerably greater than at other temperatures and increased over time. In general, medium solution NO3-N concentrations at 10°, 20°, and 30° were comparable and higher than at 40°. Over time, the general order of NAR was 20° = 30° > 10° > 40°.

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widely adopted by containerized crop growers ( Dennis et al., 2010 ). When using CRF to fertilize containerized nursery crops grown in a pine bark–based substrate, PUE (percent of applied P absorbed by roots) has been reported to be ≈27% to 62% ( Owen et

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