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Gesnariad, belonging to the genus Primulina (previously recognized as the genus Chirita ) from the Gesneriaceae family ( Weber et al., 2011 ), is native to southwest China (Li and Wang, 2004). This small rosette plant with ornamental succulent

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campus. On-campus Bobcat Bloom customers mentioned the value of learning proper plant selection for the region because many of the plants grown and sold through the program are natives and/or well-adapted to the region. By marketing plants that grow well

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greatest density of their brood cells 16 to 30 cm under the soil surface ( Mathewson, 1968 ), which overlaps with some tillage depths. The survival and abundance of native pollinators depends in part upon the availability of food and nesting resources

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Confederate rose, also known as cottonmallow or dixie rosemallow, is an old-fashioned plant that was once commonly grown throughout the southern United States, although the species is native to southeastern China ( Flora of China Editorial Committee

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Purple firespike is native to Mexico and Central America. It is a large and showy perennial shrub growing to ≈2 m tall with an upright habit. The plant has a high potential for introduction as a flowering potted plant because of its shiny dark green

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witchhazel. Chinese witchhazel is a small, rounded shrub native to central China, whereas japanese witchhazel is a low, spreading, or vase-shaped shrub distributed throughout Japan. A superior open-pollinated seedling from a chinese witchhazel observed by the

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Carolina laurel cherry is native to the coastal plain region of the southeastern United States from coastal North Carolina to eastern Texas [ U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 2018 ]. As a plant in the landscape, this species is often used for

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Non-native species are thought to comprise as much as 80% of the plant inventory held by nurseries in the United States ( Hulme et al. 2018 ). Although most introduced ornamental plants do not escape cultivation, some plants spread into natural

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expensive turf fertilizers. Although plants grown on the calcareous fill soil were always smaller and more nutrient-deficient than those growing on the native sand soil, the types of nutrient deficiencies observed and plant responses to these fertilizer

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Humate-based products have been aggressively marketed as biostimulants that increase plant growth. Little data are available on their effect on tree establishment or their interaction with fertilizer and irrigation regimes. This experiment tested several types of biostimulants on posttransplant growth of Acer rubrum L. (red maple) and Crataegus phaenopyrum (Blume) Hara (Washington hawthorn) trees, both with and without irrigation and fertilization. Soil treatments were applied at planting as: 1) control (native backfill only); 2) compost (native backfill + yard-waste compost); 3) peat (native backfill + Canadian sphagnum peat); 4) granular humate, 100 g/tree; 5) granular humate, 200 g/tree; and 6) liquid humate +, a proprietary liquid mixture of humate, kelp extract, thiamine, and intermediate “metabolites.” Irrigation regime × soil treatment interaction was significant for red maple, but soil treatments did not increase height, stem diameter, top dry mass, or root length. For Washington hawthorn, soil treatments did not increase height, stem diameter, or root length, but top dry mass in all treatments as a group and in humate-treated trees in particular was greater than that of controls. Roots of peat-treated trees of both species were longer than those in other treatments. Granular humate applied at 200 g/tree increased total root length more than did 100 g/tree in Washington hawthorn but not in red maple. Fertilizing at planting with N at 14.5 g·m-2 had no effect on any parameter measured for either species.

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