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Hypocotyl cuttings were prepared from Ii-week-old aseptically grown seedlings of Fraser fir [Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] and cultured 18 days on media containing 0 to 40 mg IBA/liter followed by transfer to the same medium without auxin. Greatest rooting (66%) occurred after treatment with 20 mg IBA/liter, whereas the greatest number of roots per rooted cutting (7.4) was noted following treatment with 40 mg·liter-1. Chemical name used: 1H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

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rooting The auxins indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) were tested at rates of 0.25, 0.5, and 2.5 μM. In addition, a treatment with no growth regulator was included in the trial as a negative control. The trial was repeated

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The effect of bottom heat, wounding, and duration of stem basal IBA dip on macropropagation of Milicia excelsa was investigated. Bottom heat enhanced root dry mass and accelerated root initiation. Percentage rooting and root dry mass were not affected by wounding and duration of stem basal treatment. However, wounding interacted with bottom heat to affect dry mass (P < 0.05). Root biomass was 60% higher from wounded cuttings than from nonwounded cuttings under the nonheated condition. Chemical names used: 1H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

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Abstract

In vitro propagated shoots of the apple rootstock, Antonovka 313 (Malus pumila Mill.)9 were rooted successfully in vitro. Roots became visible in 6-8 days, and 100% rooting after 2 weeks was achieved consistently in shoots cultured on modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) salt medium supplemented with 0.25 μm indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). Sucrose was the most influential medium component for rhizogenesis. Inorganic nutrients, IBA and vitamins did not influence rooting. Omitting activated charcoal caused only a slight decrease. A 1.5% sucrose solution added to a peat-vermiculite growing medium in vitro resulted in higher rooting than in treatments without sucrose.

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Abstract

Rapidly multiplying cultures of dessert banana clones (‘Philippine Lacatan’ and ‘Grande Naine’) and plantain clones (‘Saba’ and ‘Pelipita’) were established from isolated shoot tips on a modified Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 5.0 mg/liter 6-benzylamino purine (BA). The growth rates of these cultures, expressed as increase in fresh weight over a 4-week period, were assessed. Rooted plantlets were produced using the auxins naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), or indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) at 1 mg/liter with low levels of activated charcoal (0.025% w/v).

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Abstract

Paclobutrazol treatment combined with IBA and urea-phosphate significantly enhanced the rooting of softwood peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) ‘Maravilha’ cuttings. Application of paclobutrazol to the mother plants 8 months before removal of cuttings was more effective than application directly to the cuttings. The survival rates of rooted cuttings obtained from paclobutrazol-treated plants were significantly higher than those obtained from untreated plants. Chemical names used: 1H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), β-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-α-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-tria-zole-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

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More than 400 genotypes of Prunus were evaluated for “in field” rooting and survival from fall-planted hardwood cuttings treated with 2000 ppm IBA. Cultivars of European and Japanese plums originating from species and interspecific hybrids of the section (sect.) Prunus had the highest survival. Cuttings from cultivars of sand cherry (sect. Microcerasus) and peach (sect. Euamygdalus) averaged 28% to 54% lower survival than European and Japanese plums. Few cultivars of almonds (sect. Euamygdalus), apricots (sect. Armeniaca), and American plums (sect. Prunocerasus) rooted from hardwood cuttings. Chemical name used: 1H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

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Friable embryogenic callus of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolium L.) was induced from root pith on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 2 mg 2,4-D and 1 mg KIN/liter. Optimal callus growth occurred on medium containing 1.5 mg dicamba/liter. Plants were regenerated on MS medium supplemented with various concentrations of plant growth regulators (PGRs); the best PGR combination was 0.5 mg IBA and 0.1 mg NAA/liter. Chemical names used: (2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid (2,4-D); 3,6-dichloro-o-anisenic acid (dicamba); 6-benzylaminopurine (BA); gibberellic acid (GA); indole-3-butyric acid (IBA); kinetin (KIN); and naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA).

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The effects of stage of microspore development, cold pretreatment, and growth regulators on the embryogenic response of anthers from service tree (Sorbus domestica L.) are reported. Callus proliferation required the presence of growth regulators in the culture medium, best results being obtained with combinations of auxins and BA. Microspore embryogenesis was only induced when anthers containing tetrads or uninucleate pollen were cultured on BA-supplemented media containing IBA or IAA. A cold pretreatment before anther culture elicited a significant decrease in callus formation and inhibited embryogenesis. Chemical names used: benzyladenine (BA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA).

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Mature flowering Arbutus texana trees were successfully micropropagated from shoot tips. Optimum shoot proliferation was achieved on a basal medium consisting of WPM salts, MS vitamins, and sucrose supplemented with 11.1 or 22.2 μm BA and no auxin. Microcuttings rooted readily when pulsed with 6.1 μm IBA for 1 week and transferred to auxin-free medium. The addition of charcoal to the rooting medium improved root branching and elongation but suppressed root formation. Chemical names used: N-(phenylmethyl)-1H-purin-6-amine (BA); indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

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