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gardening principles to create a horticultural system based on real world effectiveness and environmental responsibility. Earth-Kind ® encourages water and energy conservation, and reductions in fertilizer and pesticide use, as well as reductions in the

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Abstract

Water has taken its place beside energy as a major resource considered to be in crisis. Landscape irrigation accounts for a substantial percentage of total residential and urban use of water in California. Horticulturists and landscape architects stand to affect the use of water in the landscape and, in turn, public attitudes and behaviors relating to water conservation.

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Bahiagrass is a grass species that was introduced into China from the United States. It is now widely used in southern China for slope protection and water and soil conservation. Bahiagrass has excellent resistance to environmental stresses such as

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Florida during 2008 ( Hodges, 2011 ). Water management issues ( Potts et al., 2002 ), land restoration and management practices ( Curtis et al., 2005 ; Peppin et al., 2010 ), concerns about invasive ornamentals ( Gagliardi and Brand, 2007 ; Yue et al

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® program to promote plants annually which are water-wise and adapted to the Rocky Mountains ( Colorado Gardening, 2019 ). Native plants from arid and semiarid environments, introduced by Plant Select ® program, are excellent candidates for water

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Two xeriscape gardens have been designed for the purpose of educating the public about the importance of water conservation through xeriscaping. One was designed and implemented for a temporary exhibit at the South Carolina State Fair in October of 1991. The exhibit was cosponsored by the Clemson University Extension Service and Master Gardener programs.

The second garden has been designed for the Clemson University Botanical Garden. This will be a permanant addition to the botanical garden soley for display purposes. It is designed to be a model for students, professors, and the general public to observe and study principles associated with water conservation in the landscape.

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Two xeriscape gardens have been designed for the purpose of educating the public about the importance of water conservation through xeriscaping. One was designed and implemented for a temporary exhibit at the South Carolina State Fair in October of 1991. The exhibit was cosponsored by the Clemson University Extension Service and Master Gardener programs.

The second garden has been designed for the Clemson University Botanical Garden. This will be a permanant addition to the botanical garden soley for display purposes. It is designed to be a model for students, professors, and the general public to observe and study principles associated with water conservation in the landscape.

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Authors: , , and

Conservation tillage is an effective sustainable production system for vegetables. No-till planters and transplanters and strip-till cultivation equipment are presently available for most vegetables. Lack of weed management tools (herbicides, cultivators, etc.) continues to be the cultural practice that limits adaptability of some vegetables to conservation tillage systems. Nitrogen management can be critical when grass winter cover crops are used as a surface residue. Advantages of using conservation tillage include soil and water conservation, improved soil chemical properties, reduction in irrigation requirements, reduced labor requirements, and greater nutrient recycling. However, disadvantages may include lower soil temperatures, which can affect maturity date; higher chemical input (desiccants and post-emergence herbicides); potential pest carryover in residues; and enhancement of some diseases.

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This research was supported by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station and a grant from South-Dade Soil and Water Conservation District, and approved for publication as journal series R-09039.

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Xeriscape, water conservation through creative landscaping, offers a viable alternative to traditional landscapes which require high inputs of water and labor. Xeriscape is not cactus and rock gardening; but, quality landscaping combining beautiful, function, and water efficiency.

Xeriscape is based on horticulturally sound principles, including: good design, through soil preparation, practical turf areas, appropriate plant selection, efficient watering techniques, mulching and proper maintenance.

Green plant and water industries across the nation have recognized Xeriscape as a proactive, education tool to curb excess water-use by the public and private sectors. In an era where water may become the limiting factor in economic growth for many regions of the nation, Xeriscape may truly be the state-of-the-art.

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