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Owusu A. Bandele, Marion Javius, Byron Belvitt and Oscar Udoh

29 ORAL SESSION 2 (Abstr. 013–019) Vegetable Crops: Fertilizer Management

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Rufino Perez, John Linz, Matt Rasick and Randolph M. Beaudry

149 POSTER SESSION 6D (Abstr. 354–370) Postharvest Physiology–Vegetables

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Vasey N. Mwaja and John B. Masiunas

12 ORAL SESSION 1 (Abstr. 001-008) Vegetables: Cover Crops/Culture and Management

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Kathryn E. Brunson, Sharad C. Phatak, J. Danny Gay and Donald R. Summer

12 ORAL SESSION 1 (Abstr. 001-008) Vegetables: Cover Crops/Culture and Management

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M.S.S. Rao, Ajmer S. Bhagsari and Ali I. Mohamed

110 ORAL SESSION 24 (Abstr. 551–556) Vegetable Crops: Crop Physiology/Nutrition

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Jorge Siller-Cepeda, Alfonso Sánchez, Francisco Vázquez, Manuel Báez, René Palacios, Elsa Bringas, Evelia Araiza and Reginaldo Báez

188 POSTER SESSION 28 (Abstr. 920-935) Vegetables: Postharvest/Food Science

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Ojwang J. David, Nyankanga O. Richard, Imungi Japheth and Olanya O. Modesto

on rainfall amounts and patterns without any supplemental water applications for crop cultivation. Besides its main utility in the form of dry, dehulled, split seed used for cooking, its tender, green seeds are used as a vegetable. The crushed dry

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Chin H. Ma and Manuel C. Palada

Poster Session 45—Vegetable Nutrition 21 July 2005, 12:00–12:45 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Aime J. Sommerfeld, Amy L. McFarland, Tina M. Waliczek and Jayne M. Zajicek

programs ( Chappa et al., 2004 ). In Mar. 2007, the national “5-A-Day” fruit and vegetable program led by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) became the National Fruit and Vegetable Program ( CDC, 2007b ). This program launched a new public health

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Jung-Myung Lee

Similar to many Asian countries, the production and utilization of vegetables in Korea are quite different as compared to western countries. Koreans were used to favor easy-to-grow leafy and root vegetables, but this preference is gradually shifting to other vegetables, due partially to the recent surge in per capita income and westernization of cultures. In Korea, most vegetables are being utilized in fresh state with only a few exceptions, such as Kimchi, spicy vegetables, etc. Growing technics as well as the specialized production systems of several selected vegetable crops will be introduced. These include commercial production of vegetable seed and seedlings of special kinds (grafted or plug-grown), use of virus-free garlic cloves and potato mini-tubers, hydroponic culture of lettuce and other vegetables, automation of greenhouse crop production, off-season growing, and specific growing systems for minor vegetables.