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To investigate the variation in the phytonutrients of Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.), fruit was harvested at the blush (S1), red (S2), and ripe (S3) stages from five genotypes maintained at the Secrest Arboretum, Wooster, Ohio. The S1-S3 samples were characterized for color reflectance and then frozen at –28 °C. After storage, samples were analyzed for dry weight (DW), total soluble solids (TSS), sugars (FRU + GLU), organic acids (ORG), total phenols (PHE), total anthocyanins (ACY), individual anthocyanins (IA), hydroyzable tannins (HT), and antioxidant capacity (FRAP and ABTS). From S1 to S3, DW and TSS increased by 24% and 21%, respectively, and L, hue angle, and chroma values decreased. On a DW basis, all analytical parameters were significantly influenced by genotype and stage. The ACY levels rose 7-fold during ripening, but PHE contents declined by 10%. In ripe fruit, HT comprised the bulk of the PHE constituents, whereas ACY accounted for only 7.6% of PHE levels. Variability among genotypes was moderate for all ripe fruit parameters but ACY. Ripe fruit varied little in color parameters and ACY (fwb) and IA (fwb) were not significantly different among cultivars. The Cy 3-gal and pel 3-gal levels were negatively correlated. Antioxidant capacity declined 16% to 18% during ripening. Ripe fruit FRAP and ABTS values were higher than those reported for most fruits, averaging 596 ± 85 and 629 ± 85 μmol TE eq./gDW, respectively. ABTS and FRAP values were highly correlated with each other and with PHE and HT contents, but were loosely and negatively related to ACY levels. Considering our limited sample size, we concluded that the phytonutrient capacity of cornelian cherry is substantial, predominantly associated with tannins and moderately variable among genotypes.

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( FW o ) used were 125.2 g (unshaded), 128.5 g (black), 150.1 g (red), 161.3 (silver), and 165.4 (white). Fruit color. Postharvest attributes (except transpiration) were measured in 20 mature green fruit per treatment (five fruit per plot). Fruit skin

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cultivar Red Beaut and a little greater than the reference cultivar Santa Rosa ( Table 1 , Fig. 1 ). ‘victoria myrtea’ bears large and slightly flattened fruit with an average weight of 87.6 g and an equatorial section of 55.9 mm, which is larger than the

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. Origin: USDA-ARS, Byron, GA, by W.R. Okie. Sunprince × BY87P943; tested as BY96P2634; introd. 2006. Fruit: larger than Cresthaven; more red color than Sunprince or Cresthaven, 70% to 80% bright red with an attractive yellow ground color; little

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ground color early but can be left firm on the tree several days to increase in size and red blush color. At maturity, the surface is ≈90% bright red with an attractive yellow ground color and little pubescence. The more extensive red blush of ‘Rich Joy

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Green tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum `Sunny') fruit were stored at 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, or 12.5 °C (36.5, 41, 45.5, 50, or 54.5 °F) for 1, 3, 5, or 7 days to determine their sensitivity to chilling injury. In subsequent experiments, fruit were treated with ethylene at 20 °C (68 °F) until the breaker stage was reached, either before or after storage at 12.5 °C for 0, 1, 3, 5, or 7 days, or 2.5 °C for 3, 5, 7, or 9 days. Number of days to reach the breaker stage was used as an indicator of initial maturity. The chilling threshold temperature for green `Sunny' tomatoes was near 7.5 °C, with delayed ripening occurring in fruit stored for ≥5 days. Longer exposure times at chilling temperatures resulted in reduced marketable life, dull color, flaccidity, and delayed, uneven (blotchy) and nonuniform ripening. Chemical composition was generally unaffected by chilling, while loss of firmness as a result of chilling exposure time rather than chilling temperatures per se was observed. Increased storage time at either 2.5 or 12.5 °C accentuated the initial differences in fruit maturity and thus resulted in less uniform ripening, especially for tomatoes stored before ethylene treatment, but the effect was much greater following 2.5 °C storage. Exposure to 2.5 °C for as little as 3 days before ethylene treatment caused blotchy ripening and decay, and reduced the marketable life of tomatoes by half compared to storage at nonchilling temperature. Treatment with ethylene before storage prevented chilling injury for up to 5 days at 2.5 °C and prolonged the marketable life of tomatoes stored at either chilling or nonchilling temperature. Tomatoes became less responsive to poststorage ethylene treatment with increased storage time at either 2.5 or 12.5 °C. More mature tomatoes and those treated with ethylene before 12.5 °C storage lost less weight. Vitamin C content was lower in more mature tomatoes, but ethylene treatment resulted in better maintenance of vitamin C by shortening the time to reach the red stage. No other significant differences in color, firmness or chemical composition at the red stage were found between fruit with different initial maturities or fruit treated with ethylene before or after 2.5 or 12.5 °C storage. Treating green tomatoes with ethylene before storage or transport is preferable to poststorage treatment because of faster and more uniform ripening, and also increased marketable life and reduced risk of injury in the event of exposure to chilling temperatures.

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al., 1990 ) suggests that a 400 chill unit variety like ‘GulfAtlas’ would fruit well at a location where the coldest month averaged 12 to 14 °C ( Sharpe et al., 1990 ), i.e., in a band starting a little south of Attapulgus to around the latitude of

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aminoethoxyvinlyglycine (AVG; Retain; Valent BioSciences, Libertyville, IL) to delay drop. Holding fruit on the tree beyond the normal harvest date may also increase crop value due to an increase in fruit size (yield) and improvement in red color development. Byers and

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storability and marketability. In addition, fruit are very attractive and flavorful. ‘RubyS’ cultivar is higher in fruit weight and yield than ‘Alpsotome’. Fruit shape and overall peel color coverage of ‘RubyS’ are ‘conic’ and ‘red’, respectively. Moreover

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less severe the sunburn browning and bleaching on an affected fruit is likely to appear, irrespective of the underlying damage to the peel. Although red color development may mask underlying sunburn symptoms, some sources argue that the accumulation of

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