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Luping Qu and James F. Hancock

A tetraploid blueberry population resulting from a cross of US 75 {a tetraploid hybrid of Fla 4B [a selection of Vaccinium darrowi Camp (2n = 2x = 24) × `Bluecrop' [(V. corymbosum L. (2n = 4x = 48)]} × `Bluetta' (4x) was used to generate a genetic linkage map of US 75 by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. One hundred and forty markers unique for Fla 4B that segregated 1:1 in the population were mapped into 29 linkage groups that cover a total genetic distance of 1288.2 cM, with a range of 1.6 to 33.9 cM between adjacent markers. The map is essentially of V. darrowi because US 75 was produced via a 2n gamete from Fla 4B and only unique markers for Fla 4B were used. Therefore, all the chromosomes of V. darrowi could be represented in the map.

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Luping Qu and J.F. Hancock

RAPD markers were used to determine the level of heterozygosity transmitted via 2n gametes from V. darrowi cv. Florida 4b (Fla 4B) to interspecific hybrids with tetraploid V. corymbosum cv. Bluecrop. The tetraploid hybrid US 75 was found to contain 70.6% of Fla 4B's heterozygosity, a value consistent with a first division restitution (FDR) mode of 2n gamete production. Crossovers during 2n gamete formation were evidenced by the absence of 16 dominant alleles of Fla 4B in US 75, and direct tests of segregation in a diploid population involving Fla 4B. RAPD markers that were present in both Fla 4B and US 75 were used to determine the mode of inheritance in a segregating population of US 75 × V. corymbosum cv. Bluetta. More than 30 homozygous pairs of alleles were located that segregated in a 5:1 ratio, indicating US 75 undergoes tetrasomic inheritance.

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Jose Lopez-Medina, James N. Moore, Kyung S. Kim and John R. Clark

Floral initiation (FI) was studied both in greenhouse- and field-grown plants of primocane-fruiting (PF) blackberries recently developed by the Univ. of Arkansas. Root cuttings of A-1836 and APF-13 were dug from the field and planted in a greenhouse on 1 Mar. 1997. NC 194 was included only in the field study. Terminal apices were sampled weekly starting at 0 (just before emergence) nodes of growth on 21 Mar. Floral primordia were first seen at five and six nodes of growth in greenhouse-grown A-1836 and APF-13, respectively, 35-42 days after root cuttings were planted (DAP). Under field conditions, the same event was not observed until 21 May when A-1836 and APF-13 reached at least 20 nodes; NC 194 did not show evidence of floral parts until 10 July. Once FI occurred, floral differentiation proceeded uninterrupted until completion. Blooming occurred 32-35 and 40-45 days after FI in APF-13 and A-1836, respectively; NC 194 bloomed in late August. The first fruits of APF-13 were harvested 120 DAP. These findings demonstrate that PF blackberries form flower buds soon after a short period of vegetative growth. This information should be useful for implementing horticultural practices, such as programming of the harvest date.

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J.A. Beaver and A.F. Iezzoni

Inheritance for seven enzyme loci was determined in seeds produced from crosses and self-pollinations involving four sour cherry parents and one open-pollinated ground cherry (P. fruticosa Pall.) parent. Segregation data were used to identify allozymes and determine whether sour cherry is a naturally occurring allo- or autotetraploid. Three allozymes were identified at the 6-Pgd-1 locus, and two were identified at each of the following loci: Pgi-2, Lap-1, Adh-1, Idh-2, Pgm-2, and 6-Pgd-2. Segregating allozyme patterns for the diagnostic loci Idh-2, Pgm-2, 6-Pgd-1, and 6-Pgd-2 tit disomic inheritance models and thus confirmed the allotetraploid hypothesis for sour cherry. Chi-square tests of independence between loci indicated that Pgi-2, Adh-1, Idh-2, 6-Pgd-1, and 6-Pgd-2 were not linked.

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Dirk Vuylsteke, Rony Swennen and Rodomiro Ortiz

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Sebahattin Curuk, G. Ananthakrishnan, Sima Singer, Xiaodi Xia, Chassia Elman, David Nestel, Selim Cetiner and Victor Gaba

Hypocotyl explants of three cultivars of melon (Cucumis melo L.) (cvs. Revigal, Topmark and Kirkagac), and a cucumber (C. sativus L. cv. Taoz) rapidly directly regenerated multiple shoots on Murashige and Skoog medium augmented with 4.4 μm benzyladenine. Regeneration from the hypocotyl resulted in nearly 100% diploid shoots, whereas regeneration from the cotyledons resulted in 40% to 70% polyploid regenerants. Regeneration from cotyledon explants of melon cv. Revigal required light, whereas regeneration from hypocotyl explants of melon cv. Revigal occurred in both light and darkness. Direct regeneration also occurred from the hypocotyl of cucumber cv. Taoz in both light and darkness, even though cotyledonary explants did not regenerate buds or shoots under the same conditions. This is the first report of regeneration from the Cucumis genus producing a fully diploid plant population.

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R.J. Griesbach

Kangaroo paw is a new cut flower crop native to Australia. There are several interspecific hybrids with improved flower colors, heat tolerance, and growth habit. These hybrids are sterile due to divergent evolution of the parent species. Colchicine was used to double the chromosome number of one important sterile hybrid. This hybrid is everblooming. dwarf. and heat tolerant. The resulting allodiploid was fertile, and progeny are now being evaluated.

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N. Tusa, J.W. Grosser, F.G. Gmitter Jr. and E.S. Louzada

Allotetraploid somatic hybrid plants of `Hamlin' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) + `Femminello' lemon (C. limon L. Burm. f.), and Milam lemon (purported hybrid of C. jambhiri Lush) + `Femminello' lemon were regenerated via somatic embryogenesis following protoplast fusion. `Hamlin' and Milam protoplasts were isolated from undeveloped ovule-derived embryogenic callus cultures and fused using a polyethylene glycol method with seedling leaf-derived protoplasts of `Femminello' lemon. Somatic hybrids were identified on the basis of leaf morphology, root-tip cell chromosome number, and electrophoretic analyses of phosphoglucose isomerase, phosphoglucose mutase, and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase leaf isozymes. The somatic hybrids will be used in interploid crosses with lemon in an effort to generate seedless triploid lemon types with improved tolerance to mal secco disease.

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Keiko Ishikawa, Hitoshi Kuboki, Keiichiro Mishiba and Osamu Nunomura