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improvement of native-soil systems and the sustenance of sand-based systems and incorporated into maintenance practices for many years ( Baker and Canaway, 1992 ; Beard, 1978 ; Liebao and Aldous, 1999 ; Puhalla et al., 1999 ). Research has shown that sand

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addressing issues such as tree and shrub care, lawn management, native and invasive plants, and water management. A few definitions have been put forth for organic land care ( NOFA, 2011 ; SOUL, 2013 ). In general, these definitions promote the concept of

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More than 93% of pecans [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] produced in the United States are grown in the southeastern and southwestern states. However, the native range of the pecan tree extends northward into Kansas, Missouri, and Illinois. In these northern states, commercial pecan production is expanding as additional acres of native trees are brought under cultivation and orchards of short-season, cold-hardy cultivars are established. Native nut production dominates the northern pecan industry accounting for over 95% of nuts produced in the region. Cultural practices for native pecans have been developed for northern groves that feature low inputs and good yields. Pecan cultivars adapted to the north ripen their fruit in a climate that provides 155 to 200 frost-free days. Few generalizations can be made about northern cultivars. The nuts produced by these cultivars vary in size from small [4 g (0.14 oz)] to medium [8 g (0.28 oz)] with shelling percentages ranging from 44% to 59%.

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A survey instrument was designed to determine public opinion on water conservation, water conserving landscapes, the use of native plants in landscapes, home irrigation systems, and the performance of five Texas native plant species [pink evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa); prairie verbena (Verbena bipinnatifida); red yucca (Hesperaloe parviflora); ceniza (Leucophyllum frutescens); and ruellia (Ruellia nudiflora)] grown in low water use landscapes in the semiarid Southwestern United States. On six occasions during the 1999 growing season, participants viewed landscapes and participated in a survey. Survey data indicate that over 90% of respondents thought water conservation was important to the state of Texas. A majority of participants however, believed water conserving landscapes to be expensive to maintain and not aesthetically pleasing. The survey revealed 79% of participants would use native plants if native plants conserved water, and 86% of participants would use native plants if native plants were attractive. Chi-square approximations revealed participant's opinions regarding water conservation and home irrigation systems were influenced by education level and amount of time they participated in weekly horticulture activities. In an open-ended question, participants indicated flowers and healthy leaves were characteristics indicating a plant was performing well. Throughout the year, species in flower received higher ratings than nonflowering species.

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Thousand cankers disease affects walnuts and related species [e.g., wingnut ( Pterocarya Kunth)] and is caused by the interaction between WTB and a phytopathogenic fungus, Geosmithia morbida Kolařík et al. ( Kolařík et al., 2011 ). WTB is native

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Swamp sunflower is an underused, fall-blooming southern United States native perennial plant producing a swath of eye-catching inflorescences. The numerous flower heads reside above the foliage in a corymbose or racemose arrangement, each with a

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DL amendment, whereas others responded poorly or did not respond at all ( Table 1 ). Differences in plant response could be related to a specific characteristic of the plant’s native habitat. For example, Harvey et al. (2004) reported that ‘Aureola

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Trumpetcreeper is a native, perennial, weedy vine of pastures, row crops, fence rows, and right-of-ways throughout most of the eastern United States. This vine has the potential to cause significant interference in cultivated fields with fine

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.D. Dukes, G.S. Toor, A.L. Shober, J.L. Cisar, L.E. Trenholm, and J.B. Sartain, unpublished data). Most native and construction-disturbed urban soils cannot supply adequate amounts of nutrients for normal growth of landscape plants, so fertilizers are often

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gained the attention of southern Florida growers is pitaya, also known as dragon fruit, a climbing vine of cactus species native to the tropical forest regions of Mexico, Central America, and South America ( Mizrahi et al., 1997 ). From less than 50 acres

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