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135 POSTER SESSION 20 (Abstr. 810-832) Landscape/Ornamentals/Turf: Culture and Management

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In urban forests throughout North America, scale insects are some of the most abundant pests damaging landscape trees ( Frank 2019 ). Crapemyrtle bark scale (CMBS), Acanthococcus lagerstroemiae (Kuwana) (Hemiptera: Eriococcidae), is a nonnative

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Poster Session 35—Ornamentals/Landscape and Turf 3 30 July 2006, 12:00–12:45 p.m.

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In 2000, two Cornell University faculty members from the Department of Horticulture and Department of Landscape Architecture joined together to develop a course that teaches the principles, processes, and practical techniques of landscape

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Authors: and

1 Associate Professor. 2 Professor. Supported in part by the American Society of Landscape Architects, 4401 Connecticut Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20008; the Southern Nurserymen's Assn., 1511 Johnson Ferry Rd., Suite 115, Marietta, GA 30062

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135 POSTER SESSION 20 (Abstr. 810-832) Landscape/Ornamentals/Turf: Culture and Management

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Roses are one of the most popular plants in the horticulture industry, featuring a variety of plant forms, flower forms, colors, and scents that make them versatile landscape plants. Even though cultivar development has made rose cultivation

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result, only the warmest regions of North America are suitable for outdoor cultivation of any species or hybrid. For landscape use, plants are almost entirely limited to warmer regions of California, Hawaii, and parts of the southeastern United States

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Recreational activities and aesthetic pleasure motivate US homeowners to purchase landscape products and services ( Ambrose et al. 2020 ; Chalmin-Pui et al. 2021 ). Many homeowners invest significant money and time in improving their gardens

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The Auburn University Shade Tree Evaluation is an ongoing trial of a moderately diverse range of species, and varieties of larger-growing trees. The study was initiated in 1980 with the planting of 250 selections in three replications of three trees each, located at the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, Piedmont Substation in east-central Alabama. Among the fruit of the investigation have been an evaluation of 10 red maple (Acer rubrum) selections with respect to growth and fall color characteristics; a comparison of growth rate and aesthetic characteristics of 14 oak (Quercus) selections; a comparison of the growth and fireblight (Erwinia amylovora) susceptibility of 10 callery pear (Pyrus calleryana) selections; and a 12-year evaluation of the overall best performing trees. The Shade Tree Evaluation has served as a precedent for six additional landscape tree evaluations in Alabama. It has provided a living laboratory for a wide range of educational audiences including landscape and nursery professionals, county extension agents, urban foresters, Master Gardeners, garden club members, and horticulture students. Knowledge gained from the Shade Tree Evaluation has been shared through presentations at meetings and conferences.

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