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in a shaker for 30 min. pH values were measured with a Mettler Toledo FE20 FiveEasy Benchtop pH Meter (Greisensee, Switzerland) after filterlization. The base (3–4 cm) of each cutting was soaked in 500 mg·L −1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) for 1.5 h

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). Fig. 2. Effects of perlite and auxin on rooting culture of Camellia oleifera . ( A – C ) Failing rooted plants on 1/2 Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 1.0 mg·L −1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and 2.0 mg·L −1 α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA

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. Effects of different concentrations of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) on the mean number of shoots, mean shoot heights, mean shoot dry weights, mean number of roots per responding shoot, mean length of the longest root per

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defoliation, and poor budbreak ( Sun and Bassuk, 1993 ). In Stewartia ovata , optimum rooting percentage was recorded at 2000 mg·L −1 and 4000 mg·L −1 concentrations of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) ( Curtis et al., 1996 ). Struve and Lagrimini (1999) found

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medium supplemented with PGR [cytokinin (BA), indole-3-butyric acid, gibberellic acid, and casein hydrolysate (CH)] in the culture medium showed the greatest number of normal plantlets (46.98%; P > 0.05). In agreement with Li et al. (2020b ), these

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Induction of ex vitro adventitious roots on softwood cuttings of Centaurea tchihatcheffii Fisch et. Mey using indole 3-butyric acid and α-naphthalene acetic acid Intl. J. Agr. Biol. 8 66 69 Pace, L.G. Bruno, A.A. Spanò, L. 2009 In vitro plant

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house; they were soaked for 7 d before sowing in the cold water (reservoir). Table 1. Experimental materials and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) concentration. Experimental site. The experiments were performed at Songmudao Village, Paotai

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determine the cutting type by testing the effects of gradient concentrations of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and cutting positions on rooting performance and, second, to investigate the effects of the collection times of cuttings on rooting performance and to

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supplemented with marked indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) concentrations (mg·L −1 ), either continuously for 5 weeks or only for 1 week followed by transfer to HF-½MS medium for ( H ) 4 more weeks and acclimatized plantlet ( I ) 3 and ( J ) 4 months after its ex

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A micropropagation procedure for juvenile and adult savory (Satureja obovata Lag.) explants is described. Pretreatment of the nutlets with gibberellic acid (0.57 mm) did not improve in vitro germination. Optimum shoot proliferation of juvenile and adult material was obtained on medium containing 2.22 μm N6-benzyladenine. Rooting and acclimatization of juvenile shoots were accomplished in vivo, while adult shoots were rooted in vitro after 3 days of exposure to 4.92 μm indole-3-butyric acid followed by subsequent transfer to auxin-free medium. More than 95% survival of adult rooted plants was obtained during the acclimatization phase. Chemical names used: gibberellic acid (GA3); N6-benzyladenine (BA); indole-3-butyric acid (IBA); isopentenyladenine (2iP).

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