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Buffalograss [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.] is a turfgrass species traditionally adapted to low-rainfall areas that may incur unacceptable weed encroachment when grown in higher rainfall areas such as Florida. An experiment was performed to evaluate the tolerance of two new buffalograss cultivars, `Oasis' and `Prairie', to postemergence herbicides commonly used for grass, broadleaf, and sedge weed control. Twenty to 40 days were required for each cultivar to recover from treatment with asulam, MSMA, and sethoxydim (2.24, 2.24, and 0.56 kg-ha-l, respectively). Other herbicides used for postemergence grass weed control (metsulfuron, quinclorac, and diclofop at 0.017, 0.56, and 1.12 kg·ha-1, respectively) did not cause unacceptable buffalograss injury. Herbicides used for postemergence broadleaf weed control, triclopyr, 2,4-D, sulfometuron, dicamba (0.56, 1.12, 0.017, and 0.56 kg·ha-1, respectively), and a three-way combination of 2,4-D + dicamba + mecoprop (1.2 + 0.54 + 0.13 kg·ha-1), caused 20 to 30 days of unacceptable or marginally acceptable turfgrass quality, while 20 days were required for `Prairie' buffalograss to recover from atrazine treatments. `Oasis' buffalograss did not fully recover from 2,4-D or 2,4-D + dicamba + mecoprop through 40 days after treatment. Herbicides used for postemergence sedge control, bentazon and imazaquin, caused slightly reduced, but acceptable, levels of turf quality in both cultivars throughout the experiment. Chemical names used: 6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (atrazine); methyl[(4-aminophenyl)sulfonyl]carhamate (asulam); 3-(1-methylethyl)-(1H)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide (bentazon); 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (dicamba); (±)-2-[4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenoxy]propanoic acid (diclofop); 2-[4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (imazaquin); (±)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propanoic acid (mecoprop); 2-[[[[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]benzoic acid (metsulfuron); monosodium salt of methylarsonic acid (MSMA); 2-[1-(ethoxyimino)butyl]-5-[2-(ethylthio)propyl]-3-hydroxy-2-cyclohexen-1-one(sethoxydim); 2-[[[[(4,6-dimethylethyl-2-pyrimidinyl)amino]carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]benzoic acid (sulfometuron); [(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl)oxy]acetic acid (triclopyr); (2,4-dichlorophenoxyl)acetic acid (2,4-D); 3,7-dichloro-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinclorac).

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acetochlor + atrazine or s-metolachlor at the leaf unfolding stage. This article investigates more chloroacetanilide herbicides; determines if atrazine contributes to leaf tatters injury; and compares white and northern red oak injury ( Quercus rubra L

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bluegrass requires more water and fungicides, especially in the summer months. Chemical control options for annual bluegrass in Kentucky bluegrass are limited. Use of pre-emergent herbicides before the annual bluegrass germination cycle can limit

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Abstract

Field studies conducted for 2 years showed that glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine] or mixtures of glyphosate and preemergence herbicides applied as preplant and directed postplant sprays were effective in providing season-long weed control in commercial nurseries. Oryzalin [3,5-dinitro-N 4,N 4-dipropylsulfanilamide] at 2.2 or 4.5 kg ai/ha, and mixtures of simazine [2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine] at 1.1 kg ai/ha with diphenamid [N,N dimethyl-2,-2-diphenylacetamide] at 6.7 kg ai/ha, napropamide [2-(α-naphthoxyl)-N,N-diethylpropionamide] at 2.2 kg ai/ha, alachlor [2-chloro-2’,6’-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl) acetanilide] at 2.2 kg ai/ha or oryzalin at 4.5 kg ai/ha were effective treatments when used after preplant application of glyphosate (2.2 kg ai/ha) or when combined with glyphosate (2.2 kg ai/ha). None of the herbicide treatments reduced growth of red maple (Acer rubrum L.), Norway maple (A. platanoides L.), or creeping juniper (Juniperus horizontalis Moench). Japanese spurge (Packysandra terminalis Sieb. and Zucc.) survival was reduced by treatments containing oryzalin.

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Abstract

Ten preemergent herbicides were applied to the medium surface of nursery containers 1 day after seeds of Gymnocladus dioicus (L.) K. Koch, Gleditsia triacanthos L., and Robinia pseudoacacia L. were planted to test herbicide effects on seedling survival and growth. Species varied in response to herbicides, with Robinia most affected by treatments. Most herbicides did not reduce seedling survival, plant height, or dry weight.

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, including the application of compost as an organic mulch with and without plastic mulch, soil fumigation with methyl bromide-chloropicrin, and use of herbicides, to study the following effects: 1) yield and quality responses of bell peppers; 2) the impact on

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Rooted rabbiteye blueberry cuttings were transplanted to 15 cm pots containing either builders sand or 80% sand 20 peatmoss v/v (1% OH). Five different herbicides were applied at the high and low recommended rates. Terbacil at 1.4 or 2.9 kg/ha a.i. caused a 72% mortality while 1.8 or 3.6 kg/ha a.i. application of norflurazon caused a 53% mortality. Root volume, weight, top weight, and leaf chlorophyll concentrations were reduced by terbacil treatment. Oryzalin at 2.7 kg/ha a.i. or norflurazon at 3.6 kg/ha a.i. reduced root and top weight and chlorophyll. Napropamide at 2.2 kg/ha a.i. reduced top weight and chlorophyll. Two good choices for young plants appear to be simazine at 1.8 kg/ha a.i. and napropamide.

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Cytochrome P450 enzymes in corn play an integral role in phase I metabolism of herbicides in at least six chemical families ( Barrett 1995 , 2000 ). Some sweet corn hybrids and inbreds can be injured or killed after postemergence applications of

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with the roots of nursery stock to survive transplant between field and container production areas. Also, control of broadleaf weeds in container or field grown nursery plants is often limited to herbicides that have soil residual activity and must be

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preparation methods vary ( NRCS , 2007 , 2012 ; Vaughan et al., 2013 , 2014 ), but can generally be grouped into soil disturbance (in which topsoil is cultivated) or nondisturbance (no-till with herbicide application, solarization, burns, and/or grazing

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