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L.L. Lockett, C.B. McKenney and D.L. Auld

Many segments of private industry use data gathered from public attitude and opinion research as an integral part of the planning, program development, and evaluation process. These basic techniques were used to determine public perception of five species of Texas native plants grown at three irrigation rates under xeriscape conditions. Nearly half of the average annual residential water costs go to lawns and gardens. Minimizing the amount of water used in irrigation could provide significant savings of money and a precious natural resource. The complexities of measuring social attitudes, how to develop a valid survey instrument, methods of analyzing survey data, and appropriate interpretation will be discussed. Use of public perception could be a powerful tool in developing water conserving technologies.

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Douglas C. Sanders

The diversity of site-specific management opportunities is demonstrated by the list of topics and speakers we have in the colloquium. These techniques will help use to better understand, adapt, and adjust horticultural management to the benefit of producers, researchers, and the consumer. With these technologies we will be able to reduce costs, environmental impacts, and improve production, and quality. Horticulture will use more both remote and manually operated devices that allow more intensive planning and management of our production systems. This colloquium has just scratched the surface of the potential of these techniques in horticulture. We hope that the sampling will whet your appetite for great depth of study of the opportunities that are just around the corner.

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Veronda B. Holcombe and Mary T. Haque

The concept of designing and implementing sustainable landscapes for low-income communities grew from collaboration between several community partners and Clemson Univ. It was our desire to research, plan, design, and implement sustainable landscapes for Habitat for Humanity homes. The primary goal of designing for these low-income homes was to design for sustainability. We wanted our plans to promote energy efficiency, water conservation, and low maintenance costs. These implemented principals would help the homeowner drastically cut living costs. The design and implementation of wildlife habitats was also encouraged to promote knowledge and research on environmental issues. In the beginning of our design phase we interviewed our client about her user needs/desires and later presented her with the design. This began the exhibition and education phase of the project. By exhibiting the project we hoped to education the homeowner about the sustainability issues that are pertinent to her case. Our biggest educational outreach program took place during homecoming at Clemson Univ. Partnering with other student organizations and using donated plant material from a local nursery, we constructed gardens and “planted” trees around a Habitat for Humanity house that is built each year during homecoming and later moved by trailer to its final site. We also displayed our designs inside the house and created pamphlets and brochures for visitors to pick up detailing such topics as Butterfly Gardening. Spurred on by the success of this project a web page detailing our community and organizational involvement was created. Our projects have been covered in many newspaper articles, cable TV, and in a video on service learning being produced for national distribution. As a student it has given me and my other student colleagues an opportunity to engage in and acquire valuable hands-on experience in horticulture and environmental education/stewardship all the while providing a much needed public outreach service that assists and partners with community members in order to enhance their personal home environments.

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Mark P. Widrlechner

In 1991, the USDA–ARS North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station made available for distribution 129 accessions of germplasm representing 31 genera of herbaceous ornamentals. This number increased to 329 accessions of 42 genera by 1995. During 1991–95, more than 500 seed packets were distributed to fulfill requests for these plants received from a diverse array of public and private researchers. An analysis of this demand together with expert advice from Crop Germplasm Committees and technical considerations, such as ease of culture and seed production, can help set priorities to plan germplasm regeneration to meet future demand. A recent analysis of demand at U.S. National Plant Germplasm System active sites indicated that demand ranging between 0.23 and 0.97 distributions per available accession per year was typical. Of the 42 ornamental genera analyzed in this study, 9 were demanded more frequently than was typical, 10 were demanded less frequently, with the remainder in the typical range. In order of increasing frequency, the nine genera with the highest distribution rates were Verbena, Gypsophila, Echinacea, Lapeirousia, Delphinium, Cerastium, Baptisia, Lilium, and Tanacetum. Six of these genera are represented only by a single available accession. Notably, Echinacea and Tanacetum are of research interest both as ornamentals and as medicinal/industrial crops. This poster gives a brief overview of the economic value of these genera, display the results of the demand analysis, discuss the results relative to recommendations from Crop Germplasm Committees and requestors, and consider how demand can shape management plans for the acquisition and regeneration of ornamental germplasm.

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José M. García, Cayetano Aguilera and Antonia M. Jiménez

This research was supported by Proyecto de Investigación ALI92-0393 from “Plan Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología de Alimentos” and by Asociación Onubense de Productores y Exportadores de Fresa. We thank M.C. Martínez-Peláez for her

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Alessandro Abruzzese, Ilaria Mignani and Sergio M. Cocucci

1 Dipartimento di Fisiologia delle Piante Coltivate e Chimica Agraria. 2 Istituto di Coltivazioni Arboree. Research supported by M.U.R.S.T 40%. We are deeply indebted to George Martin for reading the manuscript. We also remember with gratitude the

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Diane Relf and Sheri Dorn

Portions of this paper are from presentations given in Japan in 1994 at Osaka and Tokyo: “Planning and conducting horticultural therapy programs for different populations, “Japan Greenery Research and Development Center Horticulture Therapy Workshop

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Jason J. Goldman, Wayne W. Hanna and Peggy Ozias-Akins

1 Current address: Southern Plains Range Research Station, 2000 18 th Street, Woodward, OK 73801. 2 To whom reprint requests should be addressed; e-mail Ozias@tifton.uga.edu . We gratefully acknowledge Anne Bell, Wynn Bloodworth, Jacolyn

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Jong-Myung Choi and Paul V. Nelson

publication does not imply endorsement by the NCARS of the products named nor criticism of similar ones not mentioned. We gratefully acknowledge J.D. Garlich and A.G. Wollum for helpful discussion in planning and interpreting this research. From a dissertation

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Jong-Myung Choi and Paul V. Nelson

endorsement by the NCARS of the products named nor criticism of similar ones not mentioned. We gratefully acknowledge J.D. Garlich and A.G. Wollum for helpful discussion in planning and interpreting this research and J.C.H. Shih for preparation of the