Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 810 items for :

Clear All
Free access

Jill A. Montgomery, Ray A. Bressan and Cary A. Mitchell

Obtaining uniform mechano-dwarfing of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. seedlings within dense plantings is problematic. Alternative forms of mechano-stimulation were applied to seedlings in effort to obtain uniform growth reduction compared with undisturbed controls in both greenhouse and controlled growth environments. Arabidopsis grown under low photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) artificial light grew upright with limited leaf expansion, which enhanced mechano-responsiveness compared to that of rosette-growing plants under filtered sunlight or high PPF artificial light. Hypocotyls of seedlings grown at PPFs >60 μmol·m-2·s-1 elongated less and had 6% less sensitivity to mechanical stress than seedlings grown at PPFs <60 μmol·m-2·s-1. Fluorescent lamps alone (F) or fluorescent plus incandescent (F+I) lamps were compared for seedling responses to mechanical stress. Under F lighting, hypocotyl elongation was reduced 25% to 40% by twice-daily brush or plate treatments, and brushed seedlings exhibited more growth reduction than did plate treatments. Seedlings grown under F+I lamps exhibited similar stress-induced growth reduction compared to seedlings grown under F only, but stressed F+I seedlings lodged to a greater extent due to excessive hypocotyl elongation. Temperature-response studies using standardized F-only lighting indicated increased hypocotyl elongation but decreased leaf expansion, and decreased mechano-responsivity to brushing over the temperature range from 20 to 28 °C. Daylength studies indicated similar degrees of mechano-inhibition of hypocotyl elongation over the daylength range of 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, whereas fresh weight of stressed seedling shoots declined compared to controls. A combination of environmental growth parameters that give repeatable, visual mechanical dwarfing of Arabidopsis include low-PPF fluorescent lighting from 55 to 60 μmol·m-2·s-1, ambient temperatures from 22 to 25 °C, and twice-daily brush treatments.

Full access

D. Scott NeSmith

desire plants with ornamental appeal as well. There are a number of traits that make a blueberry cultivar relevant for the ornamental industry, most having to do with aesthetic appeal for the home gardener based on some novel characteristics such as dwarf

Free access

Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Yvon Groleau, Odile Carisse, Vicky Toussaint, Raymond Granger and Gilles Rousselle

Origin ‘SJM44’ (St-Jean Morden 44) is a new dwarfing rootstock resulting from a cross made in 1960 between Malus baccata ‘Nertchinsk’ and ‘M.9’ (‘Malling 9’, clonal selection of Paradis jaune de Metz). It was developed at the Agriculture and

Free access

Hazel Y. Wetzstein*, Allan M. Armitage, Gwen N. Hirsch and Stephanie L. Anderson

Tissue culture is a useful means to clonally propagate new ornamental plant selections, particularly when plant material is limited and/or conventional propagation methods are ineffective. An efficient in vitro multiplication protocol was established to propagate a new goatsbeard hybrid (Aruncus dioicus, × A. aethusifolia). The hybrid is of interest because it exhibits a dwarf habit, delicate white flower panicles and fern-like leaves, yet is tolerant to heat and humidity. Experiments were conducted to evaluate explant type (nodes, stems, leaves, and floral parts), disinfestation procedures, and media formulations including varying concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). Rapid plant regeneration was obtained with a shoot organogenesis system using a half strength Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 4.4 μmol BAP, 0.54 μmol NAA, 30 g·L-1 sucrose, and 3.0 g·L-1 GelGro. Studies compared the performance and yield of plants rooted using different in vitro and ex vitro methods. Ex vitro rooting of shoots during greenhouse acclimatization under mist was most effective. Regenerated plants exhibited uniform and rapid growth, and performed well in greenhouse and field evaluations.

Full access

Takuya Tetsumura, Ryutaro Tao and Akira Sugiura

A potentially dwarfing rootstock for japanese persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) was propagated by single-node stem cuttings taken from root suckers. When a mature tree was cut down at ground level and part of the roots was exposed to the air, numerous suckers formed on the exposed parts of the roots. Single-node stem cuttings 3 to 4 cm (1.2 to 1.6 inches) long survived and rooted better than 10-cm (3.9-inch) and 25-cm (9.8-inch) leafy stem cuttings with several buds. Dipping cuttings in 3000 mg·L-1 (ppm) IBA for 5 s or in 25 mg·L-1 IBA for 24 h resulted in similar rooting. Most of the single-node stem cuttings taken in late-June and July survived and rooted well, whereas those prepared in late August rooted poorly and few survived. The survival and rooting percentages were unaffected by the position on the suckers (top vs. base) from which cuttings were taken. High relativehumidity in the propagation frame appeared to enhance survival and rooting. This clonal propagation method will make a rapid multiplication of japanese persimmon, a difficult-to-root species, possible. Chemical name used: indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

Free access

Xuri Zhang, David J. Beattie and John W. White

Commercially cooled bulbs of five genetically dwarf Asiatic hybrid lilies were stored frozen at -2 C. Every 4 weeks for a total of 40 weeks, they were potted and forced in controlled environment chambers at 10, 15, 20, or 25 C. For each temperature, days from the time of potting to shoot emergence, visible bud appearance, and anthesis generally decreased as storage time increased. The number of flowers per plant and plant height were not significantly affected by storage time. Compared with those at 15, 20, or 25 C, plants at 10 C required significantly more time from potting to shoot emergence, visible bud, and anthesis. However, the temperature effects on forcing time were not linear. There was a 30-50 day decrease from potting to anthesis when temperature was increased from 10 to 15 C, but there was only a decrease of about 10 days when temperature was increased from 15 to 20 C. In contrast, there was no significant difference in forcing time between plants at 20 and 25 C. This indicates there is no need to force these lilies above 20 C. Plants at 25 C had more aborted flower buds than those at 10, 15, or 20 C. Plants at 10 C were taller then those at 15, 20, or 25 C.

Free access

J.S. Seron, R.J. Ferree, S.L. Knight, M.A.L. Smith and L.A. Spomer

Tolerance of increased salinity by tomato is of great importance to the tomato processing industry, where increased conductivity of up to 6 dS m-1 is used to increase specific yield components. A new line of miniature dwarf tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Micro Tom, was evaluated for photosynthetic response to elevated salinity. Tomatoes were grown in solution batch culture and subjected to constant salt treatments of 2.4 (control), 7.6, 12.8, or 18 dS m-1. Weekly photosynthetic measurements were made beginning week 4 on the most recent fully open leaf or leaf opposite a fruit. Net photosynthesis decreased across all salt treatments over the last six weeks of sampling. As salinity level increased, net photosynthesis decreased compared to the control. The 18 dS m-1 treatment reduced net photosynthesis relative to 12.8 and 7.6 dS m-1. Although salinity increased succulence, limitations to net photosynthesis were due to diminished utilization of intercellular CO2, rather than reduced internal CO2 concentration or stomatal conductance.

Free access

Mercy A. Olmstead, N. Suzanne Lang, Gregory A. Lang, Frank W. Ewers and Shirley A. Owens

Dye transport through vascular pathways was examined in tissues surrounding the graft union of second-leaf, field-grown trees of `Lapins'/Gisela 5 (`Gi 5') (dwarfing) and `Lapins'/'Colt' (nondwarfing). Excavated, intact trees were allowed to take up xylemmobile dye via transpiration for 6 h before sectioning the tree into scion, graft union, and rootstock tissue. `Lapins'/'Gi 5' had a significantly larger stem cross-sectional area in the central graft union than did `Lapins'/'Colt'. Per unit cross section, dye transport of both `Lapins'/'Gi 5' and `Lapins'/'Colt' was significantly less in the graft union than in rootstock sections, with still less transported to scion tissues in `Lapins'/'Gi 5'. `Lapins'/'Gi 5' had a tendency to produce vascular elements oriented obliquely to the longitudinal axis of the tree. Dye was distributed more uniformly axially and radially across the graft union in `Lapins'/'Colt' than in `Lapins'/'Gi 5', with an apparent accumulation of dye in `Lapins'/'Gi 5' graft union. Xylem vessel diameters and vessel hydraulic diameters (VDh) were smaller overall in `Lapins'/'Gi 5' than in `Lapins'/'Colt'; however, graft unions in both had smaller VDh than did rootstock sections. These observations suggest reduced transport efficiency of xylem vessels in the graft union in `Lapins'/'Gi 5' may be due to smaller vessels, vascular abnormalities and/or increased amounts of callus and parenchyma tissue.

Free access

M.M. Stahler, F.J. Lawrence and R.R. Martin

More than 300 red raspberry cultivars and selections were screened for raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) bushy dwarf virus (RBDV), tobacco streak virus (TSV), and tomato ringspot virus (TomRSV) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in three naturally infected breeding program selection plots at Corvallis, Ore. All genotypes tested negative for TSV and TomRSV. The RBDV incidence in primocane-fruiting cultivars and selections was 67%; in floricane-fruiting genotypes, it was 34%. The pattern of RBDV infection in the field showed no discernible trend. The high incidence may have been due to use of infected parents, propagation of infected genotypes, and pollen transmission. `Willamette', considered to be immune to the common strain of RBDV, along with 14 clones that had been in the field 10 years or longer, tested negative. The high incidence of RBDV in the breeding plots may provide an opportunity to identify resistant parents for breeding programs. An early seedling screening method for RBDV susceptibility is desirable to eliminate highly susceptible genotypes from the program and maintain a lower incidence of RBDV within the breeding plots.

Free access

Ebrahim M. Khah, Konstantinos A. Akoumianakis and Harold C. Passam

As good quality irrigation water becomes increasingly scarce in the Mediterranean region, especially in coastal areas where greenhouses are located, methods of economizing water consumption are essential. Therefore, the effect of the duration of irrigation on the quality and yield of seed of two cultivars of dwarf green bean (`Larma' and `Montano', Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was studied during fall and spring in Greece. Seeds were sown on 11 Sept. 2000 (fall crop) and 23 Feb. 2001 (spring crop) in peat compost and when the plants had two expanded leaves (11 and 20 days after sowing, respectively), they were transplanted to the soil of an unheated, plastic-covered greenhouse. The following irrigation treatments were applied: 1) irrigation for the entire duration (control), 2) irrigation until the first pods were dry, 3) irrigation until ≈50% of the pods had filled, and 4) irrigation till flowering. Fall cultivation was not suitable for seed production due to low yield and reduced seed quality. By contrast, the spring crop had a higher yield, seed size and good germination. Stopping irrigation of the spring crop at the drying of the first pods achieved an ≈20% saving in water without significantly affecting seed yield or quality. Earlier discontinuation of irrigation to achieve greater savings of water caused a reduction in yield, but did not affect seed quality.