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Magdalena Zazirska Gabriel, James E. Altland and James S. Owen Jr

and inorganic components commonly used by nursery growers in California. The aforementioned papers illustrate the broad number of substrate components and virtually unlimited number of combinations that nursery growers use. Physical properties of

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Jiwon Jeong, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Donald J. Huber and Steven A. Sargent

A study was conducted to determine the effect of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on textural changes in fresh-cut tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) slices during storage at 5 °C. The relationship between fruit developmental stage and tissue watersoaking development was also determined. Fresh-cut tomato slices prepared from light-red fruit that had been exposed to 1-MCP (1 μL·L-1 for 24 h at 5 °C) retained significantly higher pericarp firmness during storage at 5 °C for 10 d than slices from nontreated fruit or slices stored at 10 or 15 °C and they also had a significantly higher ethylene production maximum. 1-MCP (1 or 10 μL·L-1 for 24 h at 5 °C) had no affect on the firmness of fresh-cut, red tomato slices at 5 °C or on slices prepared from 5 °C-stored, intact red tomatoes. Nor did 1-MCP treatment have a significant effect on electrolyte leakage of tomato slices or intact fruit stored at 5 °C. Slices from fruit of the same developmental stage but with higher initial firmness values had less watersoaking development and responded better to 1-MCP treatment during 8 d storage at 5 °C. 1-MCP (1 μL·L-1) was more effective in reducing watersoaking in light red stage tomato slices when applied at 5 °C for 24 h compared with 1-MCP applied at 10 or 15 °C. Watersoaking development was also more rapid in fresh-cut tomato slices as initial fruit ripeness advanced from breaker to red stage. Our results suggest that watersoaking development in fresh-cut tomato slices is an ethylene-mediated symptom of senescence and not a symptom of chilling injury as had previously been proposed.

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James E. Altland and Charles Krause

-Kristensen (2005) assessed the suitability of miscanthus clippings for use as a container substrate by measuring various physical properties of this material and other composted crop residues. Their ( Dresboll and Thorup-Kristensen, 2005 ) research did not include

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Carlo Mininni, Pietro Santamaria, Hamada M. Abdelrahman, Claudio Cocozza, Teodoro Miano, Francesco Montesano and Angelo Parente

The most common substrate used in horticulture for growing seedlings and soilless plants cultivation is peat, alone or in mixture ( Chavez et al., 2008 ), because of its good chemical and physical properties. Unfortunately, peat is a very expensive

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James E. Altland, James S. Owen Jr., Brian E. Jackson and Jeb S. Fields

1970s, with increasing acceptance due to its availability, favorable physical properties, and lack of detrimental chemical constituents when used to grow container crops. The harvesting, dilution or contamination with wood from other species, lumber

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Jeb S. Fields, William C. Fonteno, Brian E. Jackson, Joshua L. Heitman and James S. Owen Jr.

to determine basic physical properties [total porosity (TP), AS, and CC] of a substrate for a specific size and shaped container ( Bilderback and Fonteno, 1987 ; Milks et al., 1989b ). Container size has been proven to significantly alter substrate

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George Gizas and Dimitrios Savvas

water availability in the rhizosphere strongly depend on the physical properties of the substrates, which in turn are conditioned by the shape and size of their constituent particles ( Da Silva et al., 1993 ; Hanan et al., 1981 ; Raviv et al., 2002

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James E. Altland and Charles Krause

with sodium vapor lights from 0600 to 2000 hr . A sample of each substrate was set aside at the time of potting to determine physical properties. Substrates were packed in Al cores (3 inches tall by 3 inches i.d.) according to methods described by

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Cody J. Stewart, S. Christopher Marble, Brian Jackson, Brian J. Pearson, P. Christopher Wilson and Dwight K. Lauer

, many other factors such as harvesting methods, pine species, screening or hammer milling before or after aging, and time of year the trees were harvested may also influence the final product’s chemical and physical properties. Most ornamental plant

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Mary Jane Clark and Youbin Zheng

ensure confidentiality, a potting mix reference number was used to differentiate the nine potting mix treatments during the study (i.e., MIX 1 to MIX 9). The initial physical properties of the potting mixes were analyzed using the North Carolina State