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Abstract

‘Durbin’ nectarine [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] is an early mid-season cultivar with medium sized, attractive fruit. Under southeastern conditions. ‘Durbin’s’ size and disease resistance are superior to other nectarines.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

‘LaJewel’ is a late season peach for fresh and pick-your-own marketing, maturing about 15 days after ‘Elberta’. Fruits are freestone with yellow flesh. Resistance to bacterial spot [Xanthomonas campestris pruni (Smith) Young et al.] is high.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

‘Sentry’ peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) was released August, 1980, because of its productiveness, large fruit size for its early season of maturity, attractive exterior and interior color, and resistance to bacterial spot disease.

Open Access

, confirmed via microscopic analysis or laboratory culture. After confirmation of bacterial spots on leaves, plants were treated with copper hydroxide (Champ WG; Nufarm Limited, Alsip, IL) to curtail the spread of the pathogen. During the growing season

Free access

the Horsfall-Barratt scale to assess the percentage of canopy affected by bacterial spot ( Horsfall and Barratt, 1945 ). Values were converted to midpercentages and used to generate area under disease progression curve (AUDPC) based on the formula Σ

Free access

Abstract

‘Vivagold’ is an attractive, medium-sized apricot (Prunus arnieniaca L.) ripening a week after ‘Veecot’. It is moderately resistant to brown rot (Monilinia fructicola (Wint.) Honey). It has shown some bacterial spot (Xanthomonas pruni (E. F. Smith) Dowson) occasionally but not so severe as has ‘Veecot’. It was introduced in 1978 to extend the season of attractive good quality apricots.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Velvaglo’ is a very attractive apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) ripening in the last week of July with ‘Goldcot’. It has moderate resistance to bacterial spot (Xanthomonas pruni (E. F. Smith) Dowson), brown rot (Monilinia fructi-cola (Wint.) Honey) and perennial canker (Leucostoma spp). It was introduced in 1978 as a later-ripening cultivar than ‘Harcot’, adapted to conditions of southern Ontario, Canada.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘Florida XVR 3-25’ is a nonpungent, bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) resistant to tobacco etch and potato Y viruses and both pepper pathotypes of the spot bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Dowson) Young et al. The combined resistances to these viruses and bacterial spot should prove useful in areas where these diseases are prevalent.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Harcot’ is an attractive, early season, high quality apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) with adequate cold hardiness and resistance to bacterial spot [Xantho-monas pruni (E.F.Sm.) Dows.], brown rot [Monilinia fructicola (Wint.) Honey], and perennial canker (Leucostoma spp.). It was introduced in 1977 to meet the need in Ontario for a better adapted, cold hardy and disease resistant cultivar for the fresh market.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Harogem’ is an exceptionally attractive, very firm, high quality, mid- to late season apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) suitable for the fresh market. It is cold hardy, resistant to brown rot [Monilia fructicola (Wint.) Honey], perennial canker (Leucostoma spp.), and skin cracking but moderately susceptible to bacterial spot [Xan-thomonas pruni (E. F. Sm.) Dows]. It was introduced in 1979 to meet the need for a better adapted, more consistently productive, cold hardy and disease tolerant cultivar for the Ontario fresh market.

Open Access