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Sanjit K. Deb, Manoj K. Shukla and John G. Mexal

midday ψ leaf for irrigated pecans [ Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] of southern New Mexico grown under different soil textures ( Deb et al., 2011a ). Water availability is frequently the most limiting factor for pecan productivity in the lower

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Timothy K. Broschat and Kimberly Anne Moore

micronutrient requirements, usually exhibit some degree of K or other nutrient deficiency symptoms when grown on these soils ( Broschat and Meerow, 2000 ). High N fertilization has been shown to exacerbate K and Mg deficiencies in these plants and thus

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T. K. Hartz

A 1993 survey of 50 commercial processing tomato fields in California revealed widespread potassium deficiency, as determined by tissue K levels below existing sufficiency standards and the occurrence of vine necrosis consistent with K deficiency. Soils from these fields were analyzed for exchangeable K by ammonium acetate extraction, and for K release rate by a 7 day incubation procedure (1:10 soil:. 01 M CaCl2 at 25°). Soil K release rate was more highly correlated with tissue K at midseason than was exchangeable K. These soils were further examined for K fixation capacity. Three g soil was blended with 3 ml 10 meq K as KNO3, allowed to dry, incubated for 7 days in a 1:10 soil: H2O solution, then extracted in 1 N NH4Cl; added K not recovered was considered fixed. Percent K fixation ranged from 0 to 82%. These data suggest that the inconsistent response of processing tomato to K application in numerous California trials may be related to a) the reliance on extractable K analysis to characterize soil K supply and b) no consideration of soil K fixation capacity in determining K application timing and method.

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Timothy K. Broschat and Monica L. Elliott

, 2008 ). A circular area with a diameter of ≈1 m was maintained weed-free around each palm with glyphosate. Transplant field treatments consisted of: 1) no microbial inoculant or fertilizer (control); 2) 8N–0.9P–10K (Nurserymen's Sure Gro, Vero Beach, FL

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Timothy K. Broschat

Release rates for 13 commercially available soluble and controlled-release K fertilizers were determined in sand columns at 21C. Potassium chloride, KMgSO4, and K2CO3 were leached completely from the columns within 3 or 4 weeks. Osmocote 0N-0P-38.3K, Multicote 9N-0P-26.7K, the two S-coated K2SO4 products, and Nutricote 2N-0P-30.8K Ty 180 all had similar release curves, with fairly rapid release during the first 20 to 24 weeks, slower release for the next 10 to 12 weeks, and virtually no K release thereafter.

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Carlos De la Cuadra, Alexis K. Vidal and Leví M. Mansur

to be germinated when the emergent radicle was at least 2 mm. The germination data for each treatment was fitted to the model p = A {1 − exp[− k ( t − t 0 )]} used by Mobayen (1980) , where p is germination percentage at a determined time t

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James E. Altland and Jennifer K. Boldt

depth of pine bark mulch. Wilen et al. (1999) showed that composted greenwaste, pecan [ Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] shells, and pine ( Pinus taeda L.) bark at a depth of 2.5 cm provided excellent control of creeping woodsorrel ( Oxalis

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Laban K. Rutto, Myong-Sook Ansari and Michael Brandt

significant increase in stand establishment and yield of transplanted medicinal herbs including stinging nettle, relative to direct seeding. However, there has been limited study on the effect of K supply on growth and interaction with other nutrients. Šrůtek

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Emily K. Dixon, Bernadine C. Strik and David R. Bryla

., 2015a ; Harkins et al., 2013 ). Soil in the Willamette Valley, where most Oregon blackberries are grown, tends to be sufficient in P, but N, K, and B frequently need to be applied to sustain good growth ( Hart et al., 2006 ). Organic fertilizers are

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Eugene K. Blythe and Donald J. Merhaut

H 1 : nonnormality resulting from skewness, whereas the Z ( b 2 ) statistic ( Anscombe and Glynn, 1983 ; D'Agostino, 1986b ) can be used to test H 0 : normality versus H 1 : nonnormality resulting from kurtosis. K 2 , the D