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Angela Shaw, Amanda Svoboda, Beatrice Jie, Aura Daraba and Gail Nonnecke

consisted of ‘Jewel’ strawberry plants grown in a matted row production system. The row centers were spaced 42 inches apart (Iowa State University Horticulture Station). The study was designed to be a blind study. Therefore, the field workers were not told

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E. Barclay Poling

province. Table 1. U.S. strawberry-harvested area by primary growing system (annual strawberry plasticulture and matted row), and estimated nursery plant usage in 2003. z SETTING THE STAGE FOR THE WORKSHOP IN AUSTIN To my knowledge

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Renee H. Harkins, Bernadine C. Strik and David R. Bryla

weed competition reduces yield of newly planted matted row strawberries HortScience 36 729 731 Sanguankeo, P.P. Leon, R.G. Malone, J. 2009 Impact of weed management practices on grapevine growth and yield components Weed Sci. 57 103 107 Saxton, K

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Olya Rysin, Amanda McWhirt, Gina Fernandez, Frank J. Louws and Michelle Schroeder-Moreno

, and higher concentration of micronutrients. Stevens et al. (2009) compared environmental effects of three cold-climate strawberry production systems: traditional matted row, advanced matted row (nonfumigated raised beds with subsurface drip

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James R. Ballington, Barclay Poling and Kerry Olive

plasticulture production and marketing system in the midsouth has several important advantages over matted row culture, including earlier and longer harvests, cleaner fruit, and increased quality and yields ( Pattison and Wolf, 2007 ; Poling, 2004 ). In 2003

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production Managing weeds in matted-row strawberries is perhaps the greatest challenge for growers as it requires significant labor input. Weed management is particularly critical in the planting year when weeds can have their greatest impact and when

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Chad E. Finn, Chaim Kempler, Patrick P. Moore, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Robert R. Martin and Gene J. Galletta

public research facilities, ‘Sweet Bliss’ was planted in multiple nonreplicated and replicated trials established from 2001 to 2008. In all trials, the plants were grown in a matted row system in eight-plant plots with plants initially set 46 cm apart in

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Michele Renee Warmund, Patrick Guinan and Gina Fernandez

were still under floating rowcover or mulch and did not have crop loss from the April freeze event. In contrast, all strawberries grown in matted rows or in unheated high tunnels in Missouri were lost as a result of the freeze event ( Fig. 2

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Shengrui Yao, James J. Luby and David K. Wildung

subplots of six plants initially established in 2005 at 18 inches within rows and 4 ft between rows and allowed to form matted rows. Subplots were separated in the row by 4 ft. One subplot in each plot was mulched for the winter and the other remained

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Amanda J. Vance, Patrick Jones and Bernadine C. Strik

were overhead irrigated with sprinklers, whereas at location 2, they were drip irrigated with overhead sprinklers used for evaporative cooling when temperatures exceeded 29 °C. In strawberry, ‘Hood’ was grown in a perennial matted row system with