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Jessica A. Gutierrez and Christopher S. Cramer

Experiment Station, and the N.M. Dry Onion Commission.

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Marisa Wall and Joe Corgan

This research was supported by the New Mexico Dry Onion Commission and the New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this

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Marisa Wall and Joe Corgan

the New Mexico Dry Onion Commission and the New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station.

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Marisa Wall and Joe Corgan

the New Mexico Dry Onion Commission and the New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station.

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Marisa Wall and Joe Corgan

1 Associate Professor. 2 Professor Emeritus and Jose Fernandez Chair of Crop Production. This research was supported by the New Mexico Dry Onion Commission and the New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station. The cost of publishing this paper

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Maria A. Macias-Leon and Daniel I. Leskovar

Onion ( Allium cepa L.) is one of the most important commercial crops grown worldwide. Based on the minimum daylength required to bulb formation, onions are classified into short-, intermediate-, and long-day types. Short-day onions can begin bulb

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Dean A. Kopsell, Carl E. Sams, Dennis E. Deyton, Kristin R. Abney, David E. Kopsell and Larry Robertson

concentrations of flavonoids, and various antioxidants ( Štajner et al., 2006 ). There has been extensive research into the health properties of bulb onion ( Allium cepa L.) and garlic ( A. sativum L.); however, little is known about the composition and

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Brad Geary, Corey Ransom, Brad Brown, Dennis Atkinson and Saad Hafez

Onions grown in the Treasure Valley of Oregon and Idaho are worth about $112 million annually ( U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2002 ). They are grown on ≈20,000 acres and account for about one-third of the annual total onion storage crop in the

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Christopher S. Cramer and Joe N. Corgan

The New Mexico State Univ. Agricultural Experiment Station announces the release of ‘NuMex Mirage’ onion ( Allium cepa L.). ‘NuMex Mirage’ is an open-pollinated, bolting-resistant, pink-root-resistant [causal agent, Phoma terrestris (Hansen

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G. Bélair and L.E. Parent

The influence of various crop rotations on population densities of Meloidogyne hapla, the northern root-knot nematode, and subsequent carrot yields was studied in organic soil under field conditions. Seven 3-year sequences with barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), onion (Allium cepa L.), or weedy fallow, all with carrot as the third-year crop, were replicated six times in a completely randomized block design. Carrot monoculture, two seasons of weedy fallow, or carrot followed by onion resulted in high M. hapla population densities and severe root damage on carrot the third year. Barley followed by onion or onion followed by barley harbored low M. hapla population densities and provided the highest yields, with 56.8 and 47.2 t marketable carrots/ha, respectively, compared to 2.2 t·ha–1 in the carrot monoculture. A single crop of barley reduced nematode population densities and provided 88% and 73% marketable carrot roots in the subsequent years. High M. hapla population densities and the high proportion of culls recorded in plots in weed fallow emphasize the importance of an effective weed management program for successfully using crop rotation against root-knot nematode in muck-grown carrot.