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Manjula S. Bandara, Karen K. Tanino and Doug R. Waterer

90 POSTER SESSION 14 Growth Regulators/Cross-Commodity

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B.J. Johnson

A field experiment was conducted over 2 years to determine the effects of treatment dates with plant growth regulators (PGRs) on performance of `Tifway' bermudagrass [Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy] × [C. dactylon (L.) Pers.]. For flurprimidol at 0.84 kg·ha-1, the highest injury occurred from 16 or 28 June application in 1987 and from 17 May or June application in 1988. The injury was similar from treatment dates with flurprimidol + mefluidide or paclobutrazol + mefluidide. The PGRs were applied over a longer period in 1987 than 1988 without affecting vegetative suppression of `Tifway' bermudagrass. However, in 1988, the suppression from the 17 May treatment was equal to or better than that obtained when treatment dates were delayed until 1 June or later. Chemical names: α-(1 -methylethyl)- α -[4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-5-pyrimidinemethanol (flurprimidol); N -[2,4-dimethyl-5-[[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]amino]phenyl]acetamide (mefluidide); (±)-(R*R*) β -[(4-chlorophenyl)-methyl]- α -(1,1-dimethylethyl)- 1H -1,2,4-triazole- 1-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

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Duane W. Greene

Plant growth regulators (PGRs) play an important commercial role in horticulture. Although often expensive, they are generally used on high value crops where the costs can be retrieved through the increased value their usage creates in a given crop. The impetus for development of new PGRs is generally initiated by the agrochemical industry where they perceive a need that has a profit potential, whereas the motivation for the development of a PGR by researchers is largely to aid the industry they serve. University and government researchers initially follow a prescribed protocol early in the development process, but once they have gained personal experience with a PGR, further research is often guided by personal observations and keen technical insight. During the development and evaluation process, university and government researchers are optimistic, and negative effects are generally viewed as challenges, that can and will be overcome. Discussion and effective communication are critical components in the overall development of a new PGR. Researchers generally exchange information very freely, unless restricted from doing so by a nondisclosure or other contract agreement. The underlying goal for university and government researchers is to get approval of a new PGR product and/or use that will allow growers to produce a high quality product for consumers with an improved profit margin for growers. Development of new PGRs is undergoing major change that unfortunately will lead to the development and registration of fewer compounds. There are not as many agrochemical companies, there are a decreasing number of university and government researchers, and diminishing funds available to support the development of new PGRs.

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Allen D. Owings and Steven E. Newman

Four rates of seven plant growth regulators were foliar-applied to 11.4 liter containers of Photinia × fraseri after initial root establishment. Growth regulators studied were uniconazole, paclobutrazol, dikegulac-sodium, ancymidol, 6-BA, GA4+7 and, 6-BA + GA4+7. Six months after application, plant height, plant width, growth index, and number of lateral and terminal branches were recorded.

Applications of uniconazole (30 mg a.i./liter), 6-BA alone or in combination with GA4+7, and dikegulacsodium stimulated lateral branching. The number of lateral branches increased linearly as paclobutrazol rates increased from 60 to 180 mg a.i./liter. Growth index decreased with increasing application rates of uniconazole and paclobutrazol, while the growth index of photinia treated with other growth regulators wasn't affected by application rate. Plant height was increased in GA4+7 treated plants.

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Stanislav Magnitskiy*, Claudio Pasian and Mark Bennett

Regulation of excessive vegetative growth is of importance in both field and bedding plant production. The goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of preplant seed soaking in growth regulators on the growth control of floricultural (verbena, salvia, pansy, marigold, celosia) and agronomic (cucumber, dill) crops. Seeds were soaked in water solutions of growth regulators of different concentrations ranging according to the crop from 50 to 1000 mg·L-1 for paclobutrazol, 1 to 10 mg·L-1 for uniconazole, 10 to 200 mg·L-1 for ancymidol, 100 to 5000 mg·L-1 for chlormequate chloride and dried at 20 °C for 24 h prior to sowing into plugs. In the first experiment, seeds of verbena, salvia, pansy, and dill soaked for 5 minutes in 50 mg·L-1 paclobutrazol solutions produced seedlings that were up to 43, 18, 30, and 22% shorter than the controls, respectively. Increased paclobutrazol concentrations and soaking time generally corresponded to a greater reduction of plant height, as well as delays and reduction in seedling emergence of all crops, except cucumber. In the second experiment, growth of marigold plugs from seeds soaked in 5 mg·L-1 uniconazole or 60 mg·L-1 ancymidol solutions during 45 min was associated with 23% or 6% plant height reduction, respectively. Soaking of marigold seeds in the solutions of chlormequate chloride did not significantly affect seedling growth. Increasing time of seed soaking in growth regulator solutions did not influence emergence of marigold seedlings. The height of celosia seedlings was only slightly reduced by soaking seeds in the solutions of all studied growth regulators. Results indicate that seed treatments with growth regulators might be useful in growth control of selected bedding plants.

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Mahmoud R. Shedeed, Khairy M. El-Gamassy, Mahmoud E. Hashim and Alaa M. Almulla

The experiment was designed to investigate the effect of Fulifertil at levels 0,2 and 4 gm/L and growth regulators GA3 at 0,100,200 and 300 ppm also kinetin at 0,25,50 and 75 ppm and their combination on croton plants. The results indicate that there were increases in the plant height, leaves, number, leaf area and fresh and dry weight of vegetative growth. Spraying plants with 4 gm/L Fulifertil or 200 ppm GA3 or 50 ppm kinetin gave the best results specially with combined treatments.

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Pascal Nzokou and Paligwende Nikiema

creates a challenge for researchers to develop treatments or approaches that will improve tree resistance to frost damage in case of warm winter temperatures. One potential solution is the use of plant growth regulators (PGRs) to influence the natural

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Sabrina L. Shaw, William F. Hayslett and Eddie B. Williams

90 POSTER SESSION 14 Growth Regulators/Cross-Commodity

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James L. Gibson and Brian E. Whipker

Vigorous osteospermum (Osteospermum ecklonis) cultivars Congo and Wildside received foliar sprays of daminozide or daminozide + chlormequat (Expt. 1). Both cultivars responded similarly to the plant growth regulator (PGR) treatments. Only a limited amount of plant height control occurred using 5,000 mg·L-1 (ppm) daminozide + 1,500 mg·L-1 chlormequat or 5,000 mg·L-1 daminozide + 3,000 mg·L-1 chlormequat. Flowering was delayed, phytotoxicity was observed, while peduncle length increased, suggesting that higher concentrations of daminozide or chlormequat may or not be effective at any concentration and may result in increased phytotoxicity. In Expt. 2, `Lusaka' received foliar sprays or substrate drenches of paclobutrazol or uniconazole. Foliar sprays ≤80 mg·L-1 paclobutrazol or ≤24 mg·L-1 uniconazole were ineffective in controlling plant growth. Substrate drenches of paclobutrazol (a.i.) at 8 to 16 mg/pot (28,350 mg = 1.0 oz) produced compact plants, but at a cost of $0.23 and $0.46/pot, respectively, would not be economically feasible for wholesale producers to use. Uniconazole drenches were effective in producing compact `Lusaka' osteospermum plants. Uniconazole drench concentrations of 0.125 to 0.25 mg/pot were recommended for retail growers, while wholesale growers that desire more compact plants should apply a 0.25 to 0.5 mg/pot drench. Applying uniconazole would cost $0.06 for a 0.25 mg drench or $0.12 for a 0.5 mg drench.

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C.L. Gupton

Several concentrations of mefluidide (Embark), a plant growth regulator; sethoxydim (Poast), a grass herbicide; and triclopyr (Rely) a nonselective herbicide, were evaluated to determine if italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) growth could be suppressed. Ryegrass grows prolifically during the winter in states adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico and may serve as a living mulch for strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa Duch.) and other winter crops if its growth can be controlled. Different chemicals and concentrations were screened over 5 years for their efficacy to produce living mulch. Mefluidide produced good ryegrass control but was not evaluated after Study 1 because it is designed for industrial use and does not have an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency fruit crop label. Triclopyr, which has a label for several fruit crops, was studied only in the final year and it provided desired ryegrass control at the 0.016 and 0.030 mL·L-1 (parts per thousand) rate. Prime oil (paraffin base petroleum oil + polyol fatty acid esters) concentration affected results when sprayed with various sethoxydim rates. We concluded that 0.156 mL·L-1 sethoxydim plus 0.25 mL·L-1 prime oil will control ryegrass growth at the desired level (reduce growth by 40% to 50%) for living mulch. These rates are too low to cause much ryegrass browning. Chemical names used: N-[2,4dimethyl-5-[[(trifluoromethyl)-sulfony]amino]phenyl]acetamide, 2-[1-(ethoxylmino)buty1]-5-[2-(ethylthio)propy1]-3-hydroxy-2-cyclohexen-1-one), and ammonium-Dl-homoalanin-4-yl-(methyl) phosphinate.