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Poinsettia is the number one selling potted plant produced and sold in the United States and the preferred substrates for their production are peat-based ( Hidalgo and Harkess, 2002 ). Peatmoss is also the preferred substrate for the production of

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Various irrigation treatments were studied to determine their effects on the water and aeration conditions of peat-based growth media and evaporation from these media. Low-humified sphagnum peat and a mixture of this peat and perlite (in containers) were subjected to three contrasting irrigation treatments in which the container capacity was used as a target water content. The more frequent the reirrigations and the lower the vertical position within containers, the higher the matric potential of the growth medium averaged. Furthermore, the higher the water content of the growth medium, the higher the mean evaporation was from the containers. Within each irrigation treatment, slightly more water (on average) evaporated from the peat than from the peat–perlite mixture. Due to higher water retention and shrinkage during drying, a pure peat growth medium may increase the risk of waterlogging and, hence, O2 deficiency for containerized plants if plants are irrigated frequently to container capacity. To prevent waterlogging and high water loss by evaporation, low-humified sphagnum peat can be irrigated relatively infrequently (especially at low evaporation rates) and thoroughly within a short time (especially at high evaporation rates).

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materials, such as sphagnum peat, wood fiber, and pine bark, may be difficult to accurately sort and characterize using sieve analysis. Considering the diversity of horticultural substrates, it may be beneficial if the protocols for sieve analysis reflect a

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, compost-rich substrates may result in plants with increased foliage, prone to increased transpiration and thus more susceptible to water stress conditions ( Nagase and Dunnett, 2011 ). Often the organic matter of green roof substrates is composed of peat

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Recent concerns over the environmental impact and costs of harvesting sphagnum and reed-sedge peat have generated interest in identifying alternative materials that can be used as a substitute for peat in container substrates. Researchers suggested

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evaluate the effect of storage duration, storage temperature, and filtration before storage on pH, EC, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), and nutrient ion concentrations of PT samples of pine bark– and peat-based substrates

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cycle of marigold ( Albano and Merhaut, 2012 ). Therefore, the broad objectives of this study were to gain knowledge on FeEDDS and EDDS interactions with peat-based substrate. Specific objectives were to 1) compare effects of Fe source (FeEDDS, FeEDTA

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(2007) also reported how PBH affected physical properties of sphagnum peat-based substrates compared with perlite, and they reported that the bulk density of perlite and PBH were similar. However, the effects that PBH has on the chemical properties of

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proposed as an aggregate to adjust the physical properties of peat-based substrates. Growstones were produced from finely ground waste glass. The ground glass powder was combined with calcium carbonate and heated in a kiln. The heat resulted in the

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Peat is one of the fundamental components of most horticultural potting substrates because it contributes to water-holding capacity, porosity, and cation exchange capacity of container substrates. The two most commonly used types of peat in

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