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Remote monitoring of leaf turgor pressure of grapevines subjected to different irrigation treatments using the leaf patch clamp pressure probe Aust. J. Grape Wine Res. 16 405 412 Saha, U.K. Papadopoulos, A.P. Hao, X. Khosla, S. 2008 Irrigation strategies

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life was evaluated by measuring overall quality, water loss, leaf surface color, leaf tenderness, electrolyte leakage, chlorophyll fluorescence, and chlorophyll content. Overall quality. Spinach overall quality was measured similar to Medina et al

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stress. For example, in eight co-occurring arid species, F v / F m was unaffected until RWC dropped 50% below turgor loss point (≈1.5 MPa) ( Lamont and Lamont, 2000 ). So, an irrigation effect on F v / F m might be detected if the RWC of

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overcome the turgor loss point in leaves. Their study used eight cyclic periods of 7 to 9 d of withholding irrigation and it is uncertain whether osmotic adjustment occurred in either rootstock or to what extent it may have contributed to resilience

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water into the cell and to maintain turgor pressure ( Subbarao et al., 2000 ). Actually, in a similar study, tatarian dogwood plants could improve the osmotic regulation ability to maintain its cell turgor for preventing plants from water loss and wilt

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plants are also subject to the daily changes in environmental factors such as atmospheric temperature, light, or humidity. From this point of view, the study of the daily patterns of leaf water relations and gas exchange activity is a good physiological

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dry forest tree species, in fertile soil where the cost of nutrient loss is not limiting, exhibit a remarkable array of adaptations in response to extreme seasonal wetness and drought. Drought deciduous species vary in strategies for leaf longevity and

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plant growth, leaf water relations, mineral composition, ornamental quality, WUE, and nutrients loss of Hippeastrum grown in a semiclosed soilless system. These results may be applied in management decisions of the ornamental grower for improving the

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reductions in g S and photosynthesis, leading to decreased yield and productivity for most crops ( Chen et al., 2012 ). Plants use water to maintain the flow of nutrients and their turgor; to avoid the loss of water due to evapotranspiration or any other

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leaf water deficit. Followed is the loss of leaf guard cell turgor pressure and a reduction in g S . This reduction is likely a feedback signal for plants to reduce water loss through leaf transpiration by stomata closure and thus reduce ion influx

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