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Chalita Sriladda, Heidi A. Kratsch, Steven R. Larson and Roger K. Kjelgren

not efficient for field use or for non-taxonomist collectors. The intergrading morphology of these species might be a result of genetic overlap and makes selection for superior forms difficult. In terms of the geological distribution of the four

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Ecological Landscaping: Horticulture’s Exciting New Challenge A new goal is described for horticultural professionals based on the need to create landscapes that enhance rather than detract from local ecosystem function. Tallamy (p. 446) explains

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Douglas W. Tallamy

fundamentals of “ecological landscaping.” Instead, programs in landscape architecture and design have followed a centuries-old tradition of treating plants as tools of creativity: decorations that can be combined with artistic hardscape to create beauty in our

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Basilio Carrasco, Marcelo Garcés, Pamela Rojas, Guillermo Saud, Raúl Herrera, Jorge B. Retamales and Peter D.S. Caligari

distribution and high variability ( Zietkiewicz et al., 1994 ). For these reasons, ISSRs have been used to analyze genetic diversity, individual genotyping, and genome mapping ( Arnau et al., 2002 ; Gilbert et al., 1999 ; Herrera et al., 2002 ). In the last

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Rebecca M. Harbut, J. Alan Sullivan, John T.A. Proctor and Harry J. Swartz

diverse ecological distribution of the Fragaria species ( Darrow, 1966 ) and the ecological differentiation within species that has been observed in previous studies ( Hancock and Bringhurst, 1978 ) may be exploited to develop strawberry genotypes with a

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Hua Wang, Dong Pei, Rui-sheng Gu and Bao-qing Wang

regarded as completely different species or as just different ecological types ( Kuang and Lu, 1979 ; Wu et al., 2000 ; Yang and Xi, 1989 ). Morphological comparisons allowed L.A. Dode to classify J. sigillata as a new species in 1906 (as cited in Xi

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Quanen Guo, Tianwen Guo, Zhongming Ma, Zongxian Che, Lili Nan, Yiquan Wang, Jairo A. Palta and Youcai Xiong

secondary substances accumulated. Fruit trees are perennials and there is no disturbance in the growing soil. The distribution characteristics of their root system are different from that of cereals crops. In studying the temporal and spatial dynamics of

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Hui-Mei Chen, Hung-Ming Tu and Chaang-Iuan Ho

horticultural activities were generated, including leisure belief, psychological benefit, physiological benefit, social benefit, educational benefit, aesthetic value, and ecological value. First, leisure belief refers to respondents' belief that horticultural

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weight, or soil amino sugar N were observed from lowering both N and P application rates by 20% with split fertigation. Ecological Limits to the Distribution of Codling Moth Codling moth (CM) has been identified as a pest of quarantine concern for

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Li Ma, Chang Wei Hou, Xin Zhong Zhang, Hong Li Li, De Guo Han, Yi Wang and Zhen Hai Han

( Sarwar et al., 1998 ); however, roots of dwarf apple trees are often not as well developed as in vigorous stock ( De Silva et al., 1999 ; Ma et al., 2010 ). Knowledge of root development and the spatial distribution of dwarfing rootstocks as well as an