Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 162 items for :

  • Ocimum basilicum x
Clear All

Culinary herbs are used globally as ingredients in cuisine and as therapeutic components in medications [ Cook and Samman, 1996 ; U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 2011 ]. Herbs such as basil ( Ocimum basilicum ), dill ( Anethum graveolens

Open Access

Oecologia 124 476 486 Chang, X. Alderson, P.G. Wright, C.J. 2008 Solar irradiance level alters the growth of basil ( Ocimum basilicum L.) and its content of volatile oils J. Environ. Expt. Bot. 63 216 223 Currey, C.J. Kopsell, D.A. Mattson, N.S. Craver, J

Open Access

Effect of temperature integration on the growth and volatile oil content of basil ( Ocimum basilicum L.) J. Hort. Sci. Biotechnol. 80 593 598 Cheng, J. Shearin, T.E. Peet, M.M. Willits, D.H. 2004 Utilization of treated swine wastewater for greenhouse

Full access

. Values express mg of nutrient obtained from 1 g of milled fertilizer measured by laboratory analysis. Values represent an average of three samples. Expt. B: Basil plant growth with two commercial CRF products. Growth of hydroponic basil ( Ocimum basilicum

Open Access

ornamental crops tend to differ in system design and nutrient and water delivery. Fresh market basil ( Ocimum basilicum ), for example, is typically produced in hydroponic systems in which plant roots are submerged in nutrient solution to promote maximum

Open Access

Ocimum collection reported in this study. We also thank Antonio Figueira, Cena, São Paulo University, São Paulo, SP, Brazil for assistance with the RAPD protocol. This project was funded in part by the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation

Free access

accumulation. Therefore, in our study, we chose basil ( Ocimum basilicum ) as a model plant and substituted partial red and/or blue light with green light at different green light proportions to investigate the effects of green light on plant photosynthesis

Free access

Black polyethylene mulch and weed control strategies were evaluated for potential use by small acreage herb producers. In both 1988 and 1989, the mulch greatly increased fresh and dry weight yields of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.). Parsley (Petroselinum crispum Nym.) yield did not respond to the mulch. Preplant application of napropamide provided weed control for 2 weeks, but was subsequently not effective on a heavy infestation of purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.). Hand-hoed and glyphosate-treated plots (both with and without plastic) produced equivalent yields. Chemical names used: N, N -diethyl-2(1-napthalenoxy)-propanamide (napropamide); N- (phosphonomethyl) glycine (glyphosate).

Free access

Using various mulches for small-scale, commercial basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) production was examined. Sweet basil and bush basil, on raised beds with drip irrigation, were grown on bare ground or mulched with black polyethylene, wheat straw, hardwood bark, or mixed wood chips. Bacterial soft rot (Erwinia spp.) was highest for both basils grown with wheat straw and for sweet basil grown on bare ground or with back polyethylene mulch. Both basils grown with hardwood and pine bark mulches had few soft ret symptoms. All mulches provided acceptable weed control. Yields throughout the growing season were highest with black polyethylene mulch and lowest with hardwood and pine bark mulches.

Free access

Ocimum species are largely used in Brazil both as a condiment and in traditional medicine against bronchitis, cough, and sorethroat in the form of tea or syrup. As little research has examined the natural products from Brazilian basil, 14 accessions of Ocimum, including O. basilicum (4), O. campechianum (3), O. gratissimum (6), and O. kilimandsharicum (1), collected in Brazil were grown in the Purdue Univ. greenhouse and upon maturity harvested, the volatile oil extracted and analyzed by GC/MS. Thirty-one constituents were identified. Three accessions of O. gratissimum showed high content of eugenol (40% to 66%), while the other accessions contained either high thymol (33%) or p-cymene (28% to 42%). The constituents of the single O. kilimandscharicum included 1,8-cineole (39%), methyl-chavicol (21%), and ß-bisabolene (23%). O. campechianum accessions contained either high 1,8-cineole (62%) or high ß-caryophyllene (79%). O. basilicum could also be separated chemically: a linalool:methyl chavicol type (47:28%); one methyl chavicol type (72%), and a third, methyl cinnamate (61%). One accession was identified containing >90% trans-methyl cinnamate, which crystallized during extraction. Plants rich in targeted compounds, such as the one with 90% trans-methyl cinnamate, can be used as source of germplasm for breeding and potential commercialization

Free access