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Pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] tree height was gradually reduced by removing one to three limbs per year at a height <12 or <9 m or none. Pruning at either height reduced yield but increased tree vigor, terminal shoot growth, nut size, and percentage of “standard” grade kernels. Pruning reduced leaf Mg and percentage of “fancy” grade kernels.

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in ‘Stuart’ pecan HortScience 23 570 571 Sparks, D. Baker, D.H. 1975 Growth and nutrient response of pecan seedlings, Carya illinoinensis Koch, to nitrogen levels in sand culture J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci

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midday ψ leaf for irrigated pecans [ Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] of southern New Mexico grown under different soil textures ( Deb et al., 2011a ). Water availability is frequently the most limiting factor for pecan productivity in the lower

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Pecan (Carya illinoinensis) leaf elemental concentrations are the industry standard to guide fertility programs. To provide meaningful information, a standard index tissue collected at a specific development stage is required along with established elemental sufficiency ranges. We report pecan leaf elemental sufficiency ranges used in Oklahoma that were developed based on research in Oklahoma and elsewhere. In addition, fertilizer recommendations, based on various leaf elemental concentrations, are included.

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Almost 58,000 acres of pecans [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] are planted in the western United States, which includes western Texas and southern areas of New Mexico, Arizona, and California. `Western Schley' is the main cultivar planted, with `Wichita' trees used as pollenizers. All orchards are flood-irrigated and almost no diseases are present. The pecan aphid complex is the predominant insect problem; however, orchard crowding is becoming a problem, and growers are thinning orchards and transplanting trees to new sites.

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Pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh. K. Koch)] soils in the arid western United States are characteristically high in pH, calcareous, and often saline or sodic. Economic production, when trees are grown in such soils, requires that growers pay particular attention to managing soil chemistry to avoid nutrient deficiencies, toxicities, or water deficits due to soil structural deterioration. Soil-applied acidulents, calcium-containing compounds, and water management are used by growers to manage high pH problems, sodic soil conditions, and salinity.

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Water was translocated from pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch ‘Burkett’], grape (Vitis vinifera L. ‘Thompson Seedless’) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mell. ‘Ace’) roots growing in a moist soil medium, across stem or crown tissue into roots growing in a dry soil medium, and was exuded during periods of high transpiration. Those portions of pecan and grape roots in a dry soil medium (wilting point) were maintained in an absorptive condition for 30 days, whereas tomato roots were injured.

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Preharvest germination (viviparity) can be a problem with nuts of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Two southern-adapted cultivars (`Cherokee' and `Wichita') and one northern-adapted cultivar (`Johnson') were paternal parents in controlled crosses with the maternal parent `Wichita'. `Wichita' × `Johnson' seed took much longer to germinate than seed from either the `Wichita' × `Cherokee' cross or the `Wichita' self, therefore indicating that pollen source may influence germination characteristics.

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Freezing and damaging temperatures were imposed on `Desirable' pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh) K. Koch] trees before budbreak and again during the beginning of pistillate anthesis. Freezing temperatures imposed before budbreak resulted in abnormal flowering; freezing temperatures during anthesis did not. Abnormal flowering depends on both a critical temperature (about -1.7 to -2.2C) and a critical stage of pistillate flower bud development within the 8- to 10-day interval before budbreak.

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A simple and efficient protocol is reported for the isolation of RNA from embryos and leaves of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. The method relies on suppression of the polyphenols from interaction with the RNA and their rapid removal from the homogenate by chloroform extraction. This method produced abundant amounts of high-quality RNA. This protocol is likely to be useful for Juglandaceous species and other recalcitrant plants with high levels of phenolic compounds.

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