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Lindsay M. Jordan, Thomas Björkman and Justine E. Vanden Heuvel

), glutathione and phenolic content in Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sauvignon Blanc grape juice J. Intl. Sci. Vigne Vin 40 1 6 DeVetter, L.W. Dilley, C.A. Nonnecke, G.R. 2015 Mulches reduce weeds, maintain yield, and promote soil quality in a continental

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John Masiunas

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Nancy G. Creamer and Keith R. Baldwin

Summer cover crops can produce biomass, contribute nitrogen to cropping systems, increase soil organic matter, and suppress weeds. Through fixation of atmospheric N2 and uptake of soil residual N, they also contribute to the N requirement of subsequent vegetable crops. Six legumes {cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.), sesbania (Sesbania exaltata L.), soybean (Glycine max L.), hairy indigo (Indigofera hirsutum L.), velvetbean [Mucuna deeringiana (Bort.) Merr.], and lablab (Lablab purpureus L.)}; two nonlegume broadleaved species [buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) and sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)]; and five grasses {sorghum-sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L) Moench × S. sudanense (P) Stapf.], sudangrass [S. sudanense (P) Stapf.], Japanese millet [Echinochloa frumentacea (Roxb.) Link], pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L). R. Br.], and German foxtail millet [Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.)]}, were planted in raised beds alone or in mixtures in 1995 at Plymouth, and in 1996 at Goldsboro, N.C. Biomass production for the legumes ranged from 1420 (velvetbean) to 4807 kg·ha-1 (sesbania). Low velvetbean biomass was attributed to poor germination in this study. Nitrogen in the aboveground biomass for the legumes ranged from 32 (velvetbean) to 97 kg·ha-1 (sesbania). All of the legumes except velvetbean were competitive with weeds. Lablab did not suppress weeds as well as did cover crops producing higher biomass. Aboveground biomass for grasses varied from 3918 (Japanese millet) to 8792 kg·ha-1 (sorghum-sudangrass). While N for the grasses ranged from 39 (Japanese millet) to 88 kg·ha-1 (sorghum-sudangrass), the C: N ratios were very high. Additional N would be needed for fall-planted vegetable crops to overcome immobilization of N. All of the grass cover crops reduced weeds as relative to the weedy control plot. Species that performed well together as a mixture at both sites included Japanese millet/soybean and sorghum-sudangrass/cowpea.

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Nancy E. Roe, Peter J. Stoffella and Herbert H. Bryan

A mulch of municipal solid waste compost at 224 t·ha was compared with glyphosate sprays and a nontreated check for weed control in vegetable crop bed alleys during Spring and Summer 1992. In both experiments, there was a significantly lower percentage of weed coverage in the compost mulch and herbicide spray plots than in the control plots. Weed control in the compost and herbicide treatments was similar. In the spring experiment, tractor tire traffic through the alleys reduced weed growth in all plots by 62 % and 44% at 16 and 73 days after treatment initiation, respectively. These results suggest that municipal solid waste compost may have potential as a viable mulch for weed control in vegetable crop alleys. Chemical name used: isopropylamine salt of N -(phosphonomethyl) glycine (glyphosate).

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James McConnell, Mari Marutani, Robert Schlub, Lynn Raulerson, Lauren Gutierrez and Gregoiro Perez

This publication was produced with the goal of printing the booklet on demand. The photographs were from multiple sources: scanned film, digital photographs (camera), and digital photographs (flatbed scanner). Fifty-six plants were included. Each plant was allocated four half-letter-size pages (one double-sided letter). These four pages include text descriptions of the plants and about nine images to give the user information on habit, seed, fruit, inflorescence, flower, stem characteristics, leaf pattern, pest damage, and other unique characteristics. Magnified images were used as necessary. The original digital images were in either TIFF or RAW format. The final images were in either TIFF or PSD format. Images were edited in Adobe Photoshop and various plug-ins used to enhance the images to optimize color and information that could be obtained from the printed image.

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Grant R. Manning and Steven A. Fennimore

Methyl bromide has been the foundation of chemical weed control in strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa) in California for over 40 years. The impending phaseout of methyl bromide may leave strawberry producers dependent on less efficacious alternative fumigants for weed control. The use of herbicides to supplement fumigants is a potential weed control strategy for strawberry. A 2-year field study was conducted in California to evaluate 10 herbicides as possible supplements for methyl bromide alternative fumigants. Herbicides were applied immediately after transplanting (immediate posttransplant), and 3 weeks after transplanting (delayed posttransplant). Napropamide applied immediate posttransplant was included as a commercial standard. Immediate posttransplant treatments that were safe in strawberry include carfentrazone at 0.075 and 0.15 lb/acre (0.084 and 0.168 kg·ha-1), flumioxazin at 0.063 lb/acre (0.071 kg·ha-1) and sulfentrazone at 0.175 and 0.25 lb/acre (0.196 and 0.28 kg·ha-1). Triflusulfuron at 0.016 lb/acre (0.017 kg·ha-1) was the only delayed posttransplant treatment with acceptable selectivity. Among the selective herbicides applied immediate posttransplant, flumioxazin and napropamide provided the most consistent control of bur clover (Medicago polymorpha) and shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris). Triflusulfuron applied delayed posttransplant did not significantly reduce bur clover densities, but did reduce shepherd's purse densities.

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Martin L. Kaps and Marilyn B. Odneal

Nine preemergent herbicides were applied at maximum label rate in Fall 1986, 1987, and 1988 to a `Catawba' grape (Vitis labrusca L.) vineyard in the Missouri Ozark region. The untreated controls showed 30% total weed cover by 28 Apr. 1987, 21 May 1988, and 18 Apr. 1989. In 1988, less rain fell early in the growing season; thus, weed cover in the untreated controls was delayed until late in the season. The herbicides norflurazon, oryzalin, and oxadiazon gave the longest period of acceptable grass control. Dichlobenil, diuron, oxyfluorfen, and simazine gave the longest period of acceptable broadleaf control. Most of the herbicides lost residual activity by early summer. For this reason, fall preemergent herbicide application cannot be relied on to give season-long control the following year in southern Missouri. Chemical names used: 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (dichlobenil); N' -(3,4-dichlorophenyl) - N,N -dimethylurea (diuron); N,N -diethyl-2-(1-napthalenyloxy)-propanamide (napropamide); 4-chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3(2H)-pyrdazinone (norflurazon); 4-(dipropylamino)-3,5-dinitrobenzenesulfonamide (oryzalin); 3-[2,4-dichloro-5-(1-methylethoxy)phenyl]-5 -(l,l-dimethylethyl) -l,3,4-oxadiazol-2- (3H)-one (oxadiazon); 2-chloro-l-(3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenoxy) -4-(trifluoromethyl) benzene (oxyfluorfen); 3,5-dichloro-N-(l,l-dimethyl-2-propynyl)benzamide (pronamide); and 6-chloro- N,N' -diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (simazine).