Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 68 items for :

  • "teaching method" x
Clear All
Full access

Brian J. Pearson, Kimberly A. Moore and Dennis T. Ray

students. The workshop provided an opportunity to define professional skills, identify industry employment needs, and present and discuss teaching methods aimed at developing enhanced career skills in current and future students. The following workshop

Free access

Marci Spaw*, Kimberly A. Williams and Laura A. Brannon

This study compared student learning outcomes of two teaching methodologies: a summary lecture and an asynchronous web-based method that included a case study (www.hightunnels.org/planningcasestudy.htm) followed by an all-class discussion. Twenty-one students taking an upper-level undergraduate course in greenhouse management were randomly split into two groups. Each group experienced both methodologies with presentations designed to provide complimentary information about site planning for protected environment structures; however, the order in which the groups received the methods was reversed. After each presentation, the participants were given an identical quiz (Time 1 and Time 2) comprised of questions that assessed knowledge gained, higher-order learning, and their perception of how confident they would be in solving actual site planning scenarios. Though quiz scores were not different between the two groups after Time 1 or 2, overall quiz scores improved after Time 2 for both groups combined (P = 0.03). When questions were categorized as lower-order vs. higher-order learning, a greater increase in scores was observed in higher-order learning (P = 0.12 vs. P = 0.04, respectively). Although students' perceived confidence was not influenced by which method was received first (P = 0.23), their confidence increased after Time 2 compared to Time 1 (P = 0.07). Rather than one teaching method being superior to the other, this study suggests that it is beneficial to use both. Interestingly, while students overwhelmingly preferred to receive the summary lecture before the web-based method, there was no significant difference in test scores between the two orders, suggesting that neither order offered any advantage.

Free access

P.A. Thomas and B.V. Pennisi

In Georgia, horticulture is now the number two commodity in the state. The labor needs of the industry is increasing, however, enrollment in horticulture classes at UGA has been dropping. Most entry-level employees joining horticulture firms are completely without training or understanding of the industry, the type of work or the basic skills necessary to be functional. If horticulture was taught, it was by persons with Vo-Ag training in small engines, or animal husbandry etc. Students reported teachers had very little enthusiasm for the subject, no school facilities and that the school principle/administration had no vision for, or understanding of, horticulture. We are addressing this situation through an innovative partnership between Georgia High Schools, The Georgia Department of Education, and the University of Georgia. We can reverse the trend by training new and existing high school teachers by providing them a standardized floriculture curriculum and comprehensive training in greenhouse management, classroom teaching methods, industry awareness and a provide a long-term link to UGA. Our objective is to increase the number of students who are trained, motivated and willing to work in the field of horticulture as entry level workers. To do this we set about to standardize the course curriculum statewide, certify the high-school, faculty and administration for commitment and program continuity, Set up a model training greenhouse system at UGA, and conduct new teacher training at UGA through ALEC, and conduct postcertification training for teachers at UGA during the summer to upgrade skills, enthusiasm. The venture, including a model greenhouse at UGA, has been funded for over $100,000. The program currently has 218 Schools, 64 w/labs and greenhouses, 215 teachers and 25,049 students participating.

Free access

Richard P. Marini

auto-tutorial method of teaching plant materials, and developed tape recordings along with specimens of live material combined with 35-mm color slides to supplement traditional lecture/laboratory teaching methods. He also performed research on the time

Full access

Elsa Sánchez and Richard Craig

thought necessary in the execution of this teaching method. As noted previously ( Bull and Clausen, 2000 ), using small groups created a situation where students could be more comfortable communicating with their peers. Also, using small groups encouraged

Full access

sessions favorably and learned from the teaching materials developed by the student instructors. This teaching method could be integrated into other agriculture courses as well as into those teaching leadership skills. Consumer preferences for annual

Full access

Sandra B. Wilson, Robert L. Geneve and Fred T. Davies

students who can think critically and have access to the latest propagation and production technologies that they can then adapt to local situations. Video making, dynamic electronic presentations, interactive learning, and other teaching methods in plant

Full access

Ann Marie VanDerZanden

classification for thinking behaviors. Research suggests that reflective writing can be an effective teaching method in agriculture-related fields ( Boyd et al., 2006 ; Lindner et al., 2002 ; Moss et al., 2002 ). Reflective writing assignments can be used to

Full access

Alexander Q. Susko and Zachary T. Brym

computers: An innovative teaching method for horticulture courses HortScience 25 385 388 Wickham, H. 2009 ggplot2: Elegant graphics for data analysis. 1st ed. Springer, Berlin, Germany Wickham, H. 2015 dplyr: A grammar or data manipulation. 4 Aug. 2015

Full access

matter and innovative teaching methods. Gillett et al. (p. 114) developed and implemented a series of garden activities at a 4H summer camp to determine if garden participation improves students’ science-based knowledge. Garden participants improved