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Giancarlo Fascella and Giovanvito Zizzo

cultivars Nguen Muang and Porn Ying Yai were grown in polypropylene benches (720 L) filled with two growing media composed of 1 coconut coir dust:1 perlite (by volume) and 2 sphagnum peat:1 perlite (by volume) in an open-loop system with no recirculating

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Víctor Cros, Juan José Martínez-Sánchez and José Antonio Franco

(Asfaltex no. 3, particles ≤4 mm; Asfaltex S.A., Barcelona, Spain); or 3) coir (Cocopeat, fine texture; Projar S.A., San Javier, Spain). In Expt. 2, we also used a substrate: 4) perlite (A13, particles 3–5 mm; Projar S.A.). Expt. 3. To confirm the results

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Paraskevi A. Londra, Angeliki T. Paraskevopoulou and Maria Psychoyou

In an effort to improve the physical–hydraulic properties of substrates, either pure organic materials such as peat, coir, etc., or mixes at various proportions with other organic or inorganic materials (e.g., perlite) are used to compose a

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Darren J. Hayes and Bryan J. Peterson

that were treated with solutions varying in concentration of K-IBA and inserted into propagation media varying in their proportions of coarse perlite and milled peatmoss. The effects of these treatments were evaluated in both overhead mist and

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W. Garrett Owen, Brian E. Jackson, Brian E. Whipker and William C. Fonteno

Traditionally, greenhouse and nursery operations formulate container substrates primarily from peatmoss (peat), pine bark (PB), perlite, or vermiculite for the production of most all bedding plants and nursery ornamentals ( Nelson, 2012 ). Of these

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Ajay Nair, Donglin Zhang, John Smagula and Dongyan Hu

Heuser (1987) recommended rooting Stewartia cuttings in sand:perlite (1:1, by volume) and allowing the rooted cuttings to overwinter in the same media. Media amendments like dolomitic lime ( Curtis et al., 1996 ) and calcium ( Smalley and Avanzato, 1992

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Andrew R. King, Michael A. Arnold, Douglas F. Welsh and W. Todd Watson

planting them in three different rooting substrates. Rooting substrates are typically comprised of an organic component (i.e., peatmoss) and an inorganic component (i.e., perlite), which increases aeration. A rooting substrate serves a number of purposes

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Hanna Y. Hanna

increase plant yield to gain a fair market share among major producers. Previous research has indicated that perlite growing media can be recycled to save money ( Hanna, 2005 , 2006 ), and precision heating can reduce production costs ( Hanna and Henderson

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Lucia Armin Langlé-Argüello, Gabino Alberto Martínez-Gutiérrez, Patricia Araceli Santiago-García, Cirenio Escamirosa-Tinoco, Isidro Morales and José Raymundo Enríquez-del-Valle

natural growing conditions. Therefore, the objective of this work was to evaluate the growth and content of fructans of young A. potatorum plants grown in soil and perlite, fertigated with three nutrient solutions and subjected to drought. Material and

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Rita L. Hummel, Craig Cogger, Andy Bary and Robert Riley

chemical properties and plant growth response at two nitrogen rates under greenhouse conditions. Materials and methods Seeds of ‘Little Hero Flame’ marigold and ‘Golden California Wonder’ pepper were sown in plug trays (96 cell size, 32-mL volume) in peat–perlite