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  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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-Santana, A. Arroyo-Herrera, A. Rodriguez-Corona, U. Sanchez-Teyer, F. Espadas-Alcocer, J. Espadas-Gil, F. Barredo-Pool, F. Castano, E. Rodriguez-Zapata, L.C. 2016 RAP2.4a is transported through the phloem to regulate cold and heat tolerance in papaya tree

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. Discussion Cold stress has been regarded as a major stress for crops, especially tropic and subtropic crops, such as rubber ( Hevea brasiliensis ), cassava ( Manihot esculenta ), papaya ( Carica papaya ), and banana, and its negative effects have been studied

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developmental stages of Carica papaya ( Zhu et al., 2012 ), and stressed and developing Hedysarum coronarium ( Cordoba et al., 2011 ). In our study, the top ranked genes identified by the three different algorithms were occasionally different, but

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Papaya Ringspot Virus Type-W Crop Sci. 32 1324 1330 Syngenta Seeds Inc 2009 Watermelon ‘SP-4’. U.S. Dept. Agr., Plant Variety Protection No. 200700023. 20 Sept. 2016. < http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/pvp/showpvp.pl?pvpno=200700023 >. Tetteh, A

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unique to each flower New Phytol. 165 711 720 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2005.01281.x Aryal, R. Ming, R. 2014 Sex determination in flowering plants: Papaya as a model system Plant Sci. 217-218 56 62 10.1016/j.plantsci.2013.10.018 Bensen, R.J. Johal, G.S. Crane

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.124867 Lyons, E. Pedersen, B. Kane, J. Alam, M. Ming, R. Tang, H. Wang, X. Bowers, J. Paterson, A. Lisch, D. 2008 Finding and comparing syntenic regions among Arabidopsis and the outgroups papaya, poplar, and grape: CoGe with rosids Plant Physiol. 148 1772

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.1), Herrania umbratica HuASHH1 (XP_021284799.1), Carica papaya CpASHH1 (XP_021898665.1), Populus trichocarpa PtASHH1 (XP_002306713.1), Ricinus communis RcASHH1 (XP_002528669.1), Hevea brasiliensis HbASHH1 (XP_021650631.1), MeASHH1 (XP_021630030

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Abstract

Interspecific hybridizations among 6 Carica species, including the edible papaya, produced 2 hybrids previously unreported: C. monoica Desf. × C. goudotiana (Tr. & PI.) Solms (A)R and C. parviflora (A. DC.) Solms. × C. goudotiana (A)R. Other crosses producing viable seeds were: C. monoica × C. cauliflora Jacq., its reciprocal; C. goudotiana (A, B) × C. monoica and C. cauliflora (A, B) × C. pennata Heilbron, Svensk.

Three reciprocal pollinations of the above crosses and 9 other pollinations produced fruits with under-developed seeds which were non-viable. Carica papaya L. (Line 26) pollinated with pollen of C. cauliflora (A), C. parviflora, C. monoica and C. goudotiana (A)R produced fruits with non-viable seeds. Three crosses, C. pennata × C. goutotiana (B), C, papaya (Line 5B) × C. pennata and C. goudotiana (A)R × C. cauliflora (A) produced parthenocarpic fruits (ovules completely undeveloped). Most cross pollinations which failed to set fruit were reciprocals of those which produced non-viable seed and parthenocarpic fruits. Differences in compatibility and seed viability were shown by lines of C. cauliflora from El Salvador and Venezuela and by C. goudotiana from Colombia and Venezuela.

Four interspecific hybrids are described. Heterosis was shown in 2 hybrids for tree height, trunk circumference, and number and wt of fruits.

Only C. cauliflora and its hybrids did not show the usual visible reaction to a virus with symptoms resembling papaya mosaic and distortion ringspot. As the trees progressed in age, many died of root rot (associated with Phytophthora palmivora Butl. and Pythium aphanidermatum (Edson) Fitz.). Symptoms of this disease were not apparent in plants of C. cauliflora or its hybrids with C. monoica, although the latter species has been observed to be highly susceptible.

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Abstract

Dehydration effects on freezing characteristics and survival in liquid nitrogen were studied in 11 species of tropical seeds and in silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.) seeds. Differential thermal analysis was used to determine the threshold moisture level below which seed tissue water was in an unfreezable state. Desiccation-sensitive seeds, areca palm [Chrysalidocarpus lutescens (Bory) Wendl.] and silver maple, did not survive dehydration below the threshold moisture level and did not survive exposure to liquid nitrogen. Nine of 10 desiccation-tolerant seeds [strawberry guava, Psidium cattleianum Sabine; passion fruit, Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa Deg.; Ceara rubber, Manihot glaziovii Mull. Arg.; dwarf schefflera, Schefflera arboricola (Hayata) Merrill; common guava, Psidium guajava L.; papaya, Carica papaya L., apple of sodom, Solarium sodomeum L.; prickly poppy, Argemone glauca Pope; and seamberry, Sabalparviflora Becc.] survived dehydration to as low as 2% to 12% moisture content (below the threshold moisture levels determined) and in the dehydrated state survived exposure to liquid nitrogen. Coffee (Coffea arabica L. var. Bourbon) seeds tolerated dehydration to as low as 8% moisture content but did not survive exposure to liquid nitrogen. These results demonstrate the feasibility of cryopreserving seed germplasm of several tropical species.

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Abstract

The period between flower bud emergence and anthesis for Carica goudotiana (Tr. & Pl.) Solms, C. cauliflora Jacq., C. parviflora (A. DC.) Colms., C. monoica Desf. and C. papaya L. ranged from 27-47 days. Flowers of C. parviflora showed peak anthesis between 8 and 10 AM, while in the other 4 species, peak anthesis occurred between 4 and 8 PM. Pollen of the 5 species and C. pennata Heilborn, Svensk showed satisfactory viability in vitro. Pollen germination was best in media at pH 5.5-7.5. Sibmating C. cauliflora, C. pennata, and C. parviflora produced fruit sets above 80%, although seed viability of the latter 2 species was low. Under the conditions of this study, relatively strong intraspecific incompatibility was shown between green and red segregants of C. goudotiana and between El Salvador and Venezuela collections of C. cauliflora as indicated by low fruit set percentages. Only C. cauliflora from El Salvador produced good fruit set and high seed viability from sib-pollinations.

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