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Rayane Barcelos Bisi, Ute Albrecht and Kim D. Bowman

challenges is to obtain enough plants of the new rootstock clones in nursery propagation. Although propagation of citrus rootstocks can be accomplished effectively by stem cuttings or micropropagation ( Albrecht et al., 2017 ; Bowman and Albrecht, 2017

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Suzanne C. Stapleton, Craig K. Chandler, James F. Price, Daniel E. Legard and James C. Sumler Jr.

The use of locally grown transplants in Florida strawberry (Fragari×ananassa Duchesne) production has increased since the release of the cultivar Sweet Charlie by the University of Florida in 1992. Previous research has shown that nursery region can influence production patterns of other strawberry cultivars through differences in photoperiod and temperature exposure. Transplants of `Sweet Charlie' strawberry (bareroot and plug plants) from sources representing northern (Canada, Massachusetts, Oregon), southern (Alabama, Florida) and mid latitude (North Carolina) transplant production regions were compared for plant vigor, production, and pest incidence at Dover, Fla. in 1995-96 and 1996-97. Total fruit production was not significantly different forplants among the plant source regions in 1995-96, but total yield from southern source plants in 1996-97 was significantly lower than northern and mid latitude plant sources. Monthly production of marketable fruits varied among the three plant source regions in December, January, and February, during which time market prices fell 46% in 1995-96 and 56% in 1996-97. Plants from northern and mid latitude sources produced significantly greater fruit yield in December than plants from southern sources. Differences among plant sources were detected for early flowering, initial crown size, incidence of foliar disease, arthropod pests, mortality, and fruit weight. Geographic location of strawberry transplant sources influenced fruiting patterns and other components that may affect profitability of `Sweet Charlie' strawberry production in west central Florida.

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Mohammed El-Sayed El-Mahrouk, Yaser Hassan Dewir and Salah El-Hendawy

or 1 compost : 1 vermiculite v/v) to form 13 growth media ( Table 1 ). A medium composed of coir and vermiculite (1 coir : 1 vermiculite v/v) was used as the control because of its wide utilization in nurseries. The pH, electrical conductivity (EC

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Robin G. Brumfield and Peter F. McSweeney

We surveyed 22 Australian nurseries in 1995 to: 1) develop a profile of Australian nurseries from a production, management, and profitability perspective; 2) compare the data to relevant U.S. benchmarks; and 3) identify trends and potential areas of improvement in the management of Australian nursery enterprises. The study confirmed that Australian nurseries incur high labor costs (38.8% of sales) that are comparable to United States nurseries, while costs of materials and supplies were lower than their U.S. counterparts. Overall, the costs of the surveyed nurseries appeared lower than their U.S. counterparts. Concerns of managers were directed towards recruiting and keeping labor and marketing rather than increasing capital investment to increase production efficiency. Capital expenditures tended to be funded from internal cash flows rather than external borrowings. Many of the nursery managers used relatively simple performance indicators and most business objectives were stated in general terms. Australian nurseries carried more diverse product ranges than the U.S. nurseries. Many of the nurseries adopted quite vigorous marketing strategies with a stronger emphasis on marketing than in those in the U.S. Concerns about the viability of the industry included oversupply, the growth in chain stores business, factors eroding the demand for nursery products and greater regulation.

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Jennifer L. Parke, Neelam R. Redekar, Joyce L. Eberhart and Fumiaki Funahashi

Diseases caused by Phytophthora species are among the most damaging to greenhouse and nursery-grown horticultural crops ( Jones and Benson, 2001 ; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2009 ). These pathogens cause damping-off diseases, root rot, stem

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Amy Jo Waldo and James E. Klett

158 ORAL SESSION 44 (Abstr. 681–686) Culture & Management–Nursery Crops

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Diana R. Cochran, Charles H. Gilliam, Glenn Fain and Robert D. Wright

Poster Session 26—Nursery Crops 2 29 July 2006, 12:00–12:45 p.m.

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S.M. Schneider, B.D. Hanson, J.S. Gerik, A. Shrestha, T.J. Trout and S. Gao

Soil fumigation with methyl bromide (MB) has commonly been used before planting open-field perennial crop nurseries to meet grower expectations and government regulations designed to ensure high-quality planting stock for domestic and international

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Joyce L. Merritt, Ellen Dickstein, Robert S. Johnson, Michael Ward, Robert J. Balaam, Carrie L. Harmon, Philip F. Harmon, G. Shad Ali, Aaron J. Palmateer, Timothy Schubert and Ariena H.C. van Bruggen

Florida as compared with the United States (1598 for Florida vs. 18,670 for the United States) is likely due to differences in what types of nurseries are included in these statistics. About 874 million ornamental plants were imported into Florida in 2010

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Donna C. Fare, Charles H. Gilliam and Gary J. Keever

Efficient usage of current water supplies is of great concern to container-nursery producers. Improving water management first requires knowledge of current commercial container production practices. In this study, irrigation distribution from overhead sprinklers was monitored at container nurseries to determine the distribution and the amount of irrigation applied during a typical irrigation cycle. Several nurseries surveyed had poorly designed irrigation systems; subsequently, irrigation distribution varied widely at sampling dates and within the growing-container block. Uniform distribution was achieved at some nurseries, but required careful monitoring of the irrigation system. Future water restrictions may force nurseries to improve water usage by changing irrigation delivery methods to minimize water use, resulting in reduced surface runoff and effluent from container nurseries.