Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 99 items for :

  • "bitter pit" x
Clear All
Free access

R.E. Byers, D.H. Carbaugh and L.D. Combs

Prohexadione calcium applied as a series of three applications starting soon after petal fall to `Fuji'/M.9 apple trees reduced the number of pruning cuts, pruning time, pruning weight per tree, current season's shoot length, individual shoot weights, and increased number of nodes on the lower 40 cm of shoots. Fruit diameter, soluble solids, starch, or individual fruit weights were not affected by Apogee sprays. Fruit color and firmness were slightly increased in only one experiment. Growth suppression appeared to be greater on trees cropping more heavily. When trees were more heavily thinned, less shoot growth control was achieved. Apogee applied at 250 mg/L in three applications caused a significant increase in fruit set when compared to the control. Alone Vydate, Carbaryl+Oil, or Carbary+Accel+Oil caused fruit thinning, but neither ethephon nor shading 3 days caused significant thinning. Apogee did not influence results of chemical thinners when applied between the first and second Apogee applications. The 10% and the 27.5% Apogee formulations gave similar shoot growth inhibition when applied with Regulaid or Oil+Silwet L-77. When using hard water (well water), the 27.5% Apogee formulation was not as effective as the 10% formulation. The 10% Apogee formulation has more NH4SO4 than the 27.5% formulation w/w; NH4SO4 is used to prevent inactivation of Apogee by calcium and other cations when hard water is used for spraying. The addition of CaCl (frequently used to reduce bitter pit and corkspot disorders) to the 27.5% Apogee formulation caused poorer growth control than with hard water alone. When Apogee was used at 125 mg/L, the addition of NH4SO4 restored the effectiveness of the hard water+CaCl mixture. Alone the additives NH4SO4, Ca Cl, Regulaid, and/or Oil plus L-77, had no effect on tree growth. Apogee plus L-77+Oil provided additional growth suppression when compared to Apogee+Regulaid. In 1998, three applications of Apogee (63 mg/L) or ethephon (135 mg/L) did not affected shoot growth of `Fuji'/M.9 trees at these low rates. Combinations of Apogee and ethephon gave good control of tree growth. Flowering and fruit set were not promoted by any of these applications.

Full access

CHLORIDE SPRAYS CONTROL BITTER PIT IN `HONEYCRISP' APPLES `Honeycrisp' is a new apple variety that is generating both consumer demand and high prices for producers. `Honeycrisp' is highly susceptible to the calcium-related fruit disorder known as bitter pit

Full access

of 50.25 ft from starting point). Managing Bitter Pit in ‘Honeycrisp’ Apples With Foliar Calcium Although ‘Honeycrisp’ apples are very popular with consumers, they are prone bitter pit, a physiological disorder that results in unmarketable fruit and

Free access

Thomas Sotiropoulos, Nikolaos Koutinas, Antonios Petridis and Ioannis Therios

’ do not show symptoms of the physiological disorder ”bitter pit” or ”external browning.” The fruit maintains firmness, juiciness, and flavor very well in standard cold storage (0 to 1 °C) for ≈5 months. Origin The cultivar Odysseus is a cross between

Free access

Paweł Wójcik, Anna Skorupińska and Hamide Gubbuk

Calcium deficiency in apple ( M. domestica Borkh.) flesh is a serious problem for many varieties ( Wójcik, 2004 ). Apples with a low Ca status are sensitive to cracking, sunburn, and some physiological disorders (bitter pit, cork spot, superficial

Free access

Carolina Contreras, Nihad Alsmairat and Randy Beaudry

bitter pit were evaluated visually and the incidence of the damage determined. CA-related injury to the cortex (brown lesions and lens-shaped cavities, the latter typically associated with smaller brown lesions) and senescence breakdown were evaluated by

Free access

Christopher B. Watkins and Jacqueline F. Nock

to a number of physiological disorders including bitter pit, soft scald, soggy breakdown, low temperature breakdown, and senescent breakdown ( DeEll and Ehsani-Moghaddam, 2010 ; DeLong et al., 2006 ; Moran et al., 2009 ; Rosenberger et al., 2004

Full access

temperature disorders such as soft scald and soggy breakdown, and disorders such as bitter pit that are exacerbated by warmer storage temperatures. Al Shoffe and Watkins (p. 481) found that short-term storage (1 to 4 weeks) at 33 °F followed by storage at 38

Free access

Sara Serra, Rachel Leisso, Luca Giordani, Lee Kalcsits and Stefano Musacchi

leaves and, subsequently, affects postharvest fruit quality and postharvest susceptibility to storage disorders. Young ‘Honeycrisp’ orchards are susceptible to bitter pit and symptoms can appear before harvest or during storage ( Rosenberger et al., 2004

Free access

W. Robert Trentham, Carl E. Sams and William S. Conway

harvest and in extended cold storage ( Recasens et al., 2004 ). Increasing the Ca content of apples maintains fruit firmness, decreases the incidence of disorders such as water core, bitter pit, and internal breakdown ( Bangerth et al., 1972 ; Dierend and