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Plum ( Prunus salicina ) is one of the most important stone fruits cultivated worldwide ( Li et al., 2015 ). Plum fruits are rich in fiber and polyphenolics ( Kim et al., 2003 ; Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis et al., 2001 ) and are becoming increasingly

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Abstract

A sand culture system was used to compare growth reduction in Prunus rootstocks due to high A1 concentration. Aluminum at 50 mg liter-1 nutrient solution resulted in A1 tissue levels of 288 to 408 mg.kg-1, shoot growth reduction of 41% to 77%, and root growth reduction of 9% to 86%. Based on relative growth reduction, Prunus tomentosa Thunb. was more sensitive to A1 toxicity than were Nemaguard, Nemared, ‘Lovell’ [P. persica (L.) Batsch], P. besseyi Bailey, P. cerasifera Ehrh., and P. insititia L. Nemaguard and P. tomentosa had higher shoot A1 concentration at 50 mg Al/liter than the other rootstocks tested.

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Self-incompatibility (SI) is the ability of a fertile hermaphrodite flowering plant to prevent self-fertilization by discriminating between self and nonself pollen. Japanese plum ( Prunus salicina Lindl.), a species of the Rosaceae family

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Owing to flowering beautifully and colorfully in early spring, Prunus discoidea (Yu & Li) Wei & Chang is known as the “spring cherry” in Chinese. It grows commonly in forest valleys and thickets near streams at altitudes of 200 to 1100 m ( Li

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Peach ( Prunus persica L.) is native to China and has been cultivated in China for the past 4000 to 5000 years ( Ahmad et al., 2011 ; Maynard, 2008 ; Thacker, 1985 ). The homogeneity of peach recently resulted in the erosion of genetic diversity

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Flower buds of 20 Prunus species showed quite different strategies to cope with low temperatures. Buds of most species deep supercooled. The two hardiest species, both from the subgenus Padus (P. padus L. and P. virginiana L.), did not supercool and survived -33C with no bud kill. Prunus serotina J.F. Ehrh., also in Padus, did supercool. Prunus nigra Ait., P. americana Marsh, P. fruticosa Pall., and P. besseyi L.H. Bailey had a low minimum hardiness level (MHL), small buds, and a low water content. Exotherms were no longer detectable from the buds of these species after 2 days at -7C and some buds survived -33C. Prunus triloba Lindl. and P. japonica Thunb. were similar to that group, but no buds survived -33C. Prunus davidiana (Carriere) Franch., P. avium L., and P. domestica L. had a relatively high MHL but hardened rapidly when the buds were frozen. Prunus persica (L.) Batsch., P. subhirtella Miq., P. dulcis (Mill) D. A. Webb, and P. emarginata (Dougl. ex Hook) Walp. deep supercooled, had large flower buds and a high MHL, and were killed in the Dec. 1990 freeze. Prunus salicina Lindl., P. hortulana L.H. Bailey, P. armeniaca L., and P. tomentosa Thunb. were in an intermediate group with a moderately low MHL and a moderate rate of hardiness increase while frozen. Prunus dulcis and P. davidiana had a low chilling requirement and bloomed early, whereas P. virginiana, P. fruticosa, P. nigra, and P. domestica had high chilling requirements and bloomed late.

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Self-compatible cultivars of Japanese apricot (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.) have a horticultural advantage over self-incompatible ones because no pollinizer is required. Self-incompatibility is gametophytic, as in other Prunus species. We searched for molecular markers to identify self-compatible cultivars based on the information about S-ribonucleases (S-RNases) of other Prunus species. Total DNA isolated from five self-incompatible and six self-compatible cultivars were PCR-amplified by oligonucleotide primers designed from conserved regions of Prunus S-RNases. Self-compatible cultivars exhibited a common band of ≈1.5 kbp. Self-compatible cultivars also showed a common band of ≈12.1 kbp when genomic DNA digested with HindIII was probed with the cDNA encoding S 2-RNase of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.). These results suggest that self-compatible cultivars of Japanese apricot have a common S-RNase allele that can be used as a molecular marker for self-compatibility.

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Nitrogen is the most important element for maintaining growth and high productivity in tree fruits ( Titus and Kang, 1982 ). Sweet cherries ( Prunus avium L.) on precocious, interspecific ( P. cerasus × P. canescens ) Gisela® (Gi) rootstocks (e

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Abstract

Fruit anthocyanins (ACY) of eight Prunus spp. representing two subgenera (subg.) and three sections (sect.) were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Fruit of P. angustifolia Marsh., P. hortulana Bailey, and P. maritima Marsh. all North American members of subg. Prunus sect. Prunocerasus, were qualitatively identical in ACY composition, containing cyanidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside. Fruit of P. cerasifera Ehrh. and P. spinosa L., both Eurasian members of subg. Prunus sect. Prunus, contained small amounts of peonidin-3-gIuco-side and peonidin-3-rutinoside, in addition to the 3-glucoside and 3-rutinoside of cyanidin. Fruit of P. besseyi Bailey and P. pumila L. (subg. Lithocerasus sect. Microcerasus) contained cyanidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside. Fruit of P. pumila also contained trace amounts of peonidin-3-rutinoside. Fruit of P. japonica Thunb., a Chinese member of subg. Lithocerasus sect. Microcerasus, showed a complex ACY profile distinct from P. besseyi and P. pumila.

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Authors: and

Abstract

In the article “‘Hansen 2168’ and ‘Hansen536’: Two New Prunus Rootstock Clones” by Dale E. Kester and R.N. Asay (HortScience 21:331–332), Fig. 2 was printed upside-down. The correct orientation is shown below.

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