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Decisions regarding the selection and care of trees on public lands often are delegated to public employees with limited knowledge of tree care. To provide a technical resource for the municipal employee, the Urban Forestry Notebook was developed through sponsorship by Puget Power (a major Pacific Northwest utility company), Washington State Department of Natural Resources, and the Center. The unique focus of this Notebook provided the municipal employee with information on the selection and care of 65 of the most important urban trees. It also can be used as a model by other communities who wish to improve the care of their urban trees by providing an informational resource for the public employee.

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fields. A typical class numbers 40 students. Much of the information presented is derived from research carried out by the Urban Horticulture Institute in the Department of Horticulture at Cornell University, a program that focuses on the rehabilitation

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Drought and rapid population growth strain urban water supplies throughout the urbanizing Intermountain West (IMW). Irrigated urban landscapes are the largest use of municipal water resources and can consume ≈60% of potable municipal water in the

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Urban Horticulture is a new area of scientific horticulture concerned with functional uses of plants to maintain and improve urban environments. “Functional uses” means that plants are used not only for beauty and ornamentation, but also as screens against wind, headlights, and unpleasant views, to influence climate, perhaps to reduce noise and combat forms of air pollution, for essential food and variation in human diet, and to improve the human psyche in densely populated areas. The constituent audiences for urban horticulture are people who utilize plants, primarily in landscape situations, including landscape maintenance and parks personnel, landscape architects, arborists, highway planters, nursery contractors, members of plant societies, and amateur horticulturists.

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Water and chemical use in urbanized areas is significantly influenced by the desire for beautiful landscapes ( Haley et al., 2007 ; Hipp et al., 1993 ). Improper irrigation and fertilization of ornamentals in urban landscapes may result in water

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In a unique partnership. the University of Kentucky Dept. of Horticulture, the Cooperative Extension Service, and the Kentucky State Division of Forestry are teaming up to produce two training packages for “train-the-trainer” workshops throughout the state. The workshops will be open to people interested in urban/community trees and arboriculture.

The first training session will be held in 1993 and will cover five modules: 1) Designing the planting site to compensate for a disturbed environment; 2) Species selection for the existing site; 3) Scientific planting techniques; 4) Post-planting care: and 5) Integrated pest management.

The second training session will be held in 1994 and will cover the following topics: 1) Establishing a scientific management program for the urban forest; 2) Preparation and administration of grants: 3) Fund-raising and efficient use of volunteers; 4) Developing an urban tree inventory; 5) Recognition of hazard trees; and 6) Selecting quality nursery stock.

The training packages will consist of a written manual, videos, and slide sets. Training sessions are open to foresters, county agents, city planners, developers, and others in Kentucky who are interested in returning to their communities and training others on the topics covered.

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Literature cited Abbasalizadeh Rezakolai, S. Samadi, D. Tabatabaian, M. 2015 Analysis of Persian gardens using Kaplan’s landscape preference theory: Case study: Fin Garden, Shahzadeh Garden, Eram Garden, and Eli-Goli Garden Intl. J. Architectural Eng. Urban

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Across the arid to semiarid U.S. Intermountain West (IMW) human populations increase but water supplies do not. Combined with cyclic drought, water shortages in IMW urban areas challenge managers to conserve water in irrigated urban landscapes

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Nationally, the urban and community forests are in a state of rapid decline. About 52% of street trees are dead or dying. The average tree life of the urban areas is about five times less than in rural areas. The growing national awareness of the importance and benefits of trees and their role in maintaining a healthy environment magnifies the need for urban forestry training programs. The Southern University Urban Forestry Program (funded by USDA Forest Service, Southern Region) is set up to address the critical need for high quality, user-oriented urban forestry training for minority students, and to bridge the gap between minority participation and national forestry resources, education and management programs. This unique program places major emphasis on experiential learning activities in addition to sound academic education. The four-year curriculum will be centered around forestry, horticulture, urban and community planning and landscape architecture.

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recharge, and moderating urban heat islands ( Cameron et al., 2012 ; Nowak et al., 2006 ; Pataki et al., 2011 ) are all ways that CH systems directly contribute to environmental sustainability. Systems and practices of CH also influence human health and

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