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Patrice Cannavo, Houda Hafdhi and Jean-Charles Michel

conductivity, diffusivity and sorptivity of unsaturated soils: Fields methods 771 798 Klute A. Methods of soil analysis. Part 1 2nd Ed Agron. Monogr. 9. ASA and SSSA Madison, WI Gruda, N. Schnitzler, W.H. 2003 Suitability of wood fiber substrate for production

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Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright and Nazim Gruda

. Schnitzler, W.H. 2006 Wood fiber substrates as a peat alternative for vegetable production Eur. J. Wood Wood Prod. 64 347 350 Gruda, N. Tucher, S.V. Schnitzler, W.H. 2000 N-immobilization of wood fiber

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Guifang Qi, Jean-Charles Michel, Pascal Boivin and Sylvain Charpentier

.A. 1981 Physical properties of three container media and their effect on poinsettia growth J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 106 736 741 Gruda, N. Schnitzler, W.H. 2004 Suitability of wood fiber substrate for production of vegetable transplants. I. Physical

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Isabelle Lemay, Jean Caron, Martine Dorais and Steeve Pepin

, the low water availability and salt accumulation problems needed to be addressed for sawdust to have full productivity potential. Bégin (2008) and Dorais et al. (2005) showed that adding 30% wood fiber to sawdust (less than 6 mm) growing media

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Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright and Mark M. Alley

micro-organisms ( Gutser et al., 1983 ; Prasad, 1997 ); 2) a nutrient impregnation process used in the production of Toresa®, a commercial wood fiber substrate in Europe, mechanically grinds wood chips together with nutrient compounds in machines called

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Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright and Michael C. Barnes

Gruda, N. Schnitzler, W.H. 2004 Suitability of wood fiber substrate for production of vegetable transplants. I. Physical properties of wood fiber substrates Scientia Hort. 100 309 322 Gruda, N. Sippel, C

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Jaroslav Ďurkovič, František Kačík, Miroslava Mamoňová, Monika Kardošová, Roman Longauer and Jana Krajňáková

adhesion among mechanically active wood fibers ( Mancera et al., 2012 ) plus higher strength, hydrophobicity, and rigidity to the secondary cell walls of water-conducting and supportive tissues ( Bonawitz and Chapple, 2010 ). Higher lignin content also

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Tongyin Li, Guihong Bi and Richard L. Harkess

peat, manure, coir, straw, and wood fiber have been evaluated and found to produce plants of comparable quality to traditional plastic containers ( Koeser et al., 2013a ; Kuehny et al., 2011 ). Depending on the hydrophilic or hydrophobic materials that

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Caitlin E. Splawski, Emilie E. Regnier, S. Kent Harrison, Mark A. Bennett and James D. Metzger

used as mulch materials have included grass clippings, straw of various cereal grains, wood fiber chipped from downed trees, and municipal leaf waste ( Duppong et al., 2004 ). However, biological residues vary widely in N content and bioavailability

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Tongyin Li, Guihong Bi, Richard L. Harkess, Geoffrey C. Denny, Eugene K. Blythe and Xiaojie Zhao

alternative to plastic containers can alter water consumption characteristics of container-grown plants ( Koeser et al., 2013a ; Wang et al., 2015 ). Biocontainers constructed with materials such as peat, wood fiber, straw, or paper are highly porous and tend