Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 256 items for :

  • "vegetative propagation" x
Clear All
Free access

Haley Hibbert-Frey, John Frampton, Frank A. Blazich, Doug Hundley and L. Eric Hinesley

branches increase in age, length, and diameter from top to bottom of the tree. In vegetative propagation studies, stem cuttings of higher order often root in greater percentages than those of lower order ( Copes, 1992 ; Garlo, 1980 ), but this

Free access

Masafumi Johkan, Genjirou Mori, Kazuhiko Mitsukuri, Keiichirou Mishiba, Toshinobu Morikawa and Masayuki Oda

Tomato plants ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) are commonly propagated by seed. Recently, however, several tomato cultivars reproduced by vegetative propagation have been released for tomato production. Such cultivars developed through

Free access

Warren E. Copes and Eugene K. Blythe

stems with new stem growth can be colonized by Rhizoctonia AG P during the spring when those stems are harvested for vegetative propagation (W.E. Copes, unpublished data). Rhizoctonia spp. are spread on cuttings of a variety of ornamental plants

Free access

Gina E. Fernandez and John R. Clark

Free access

R. Nunez-Elisea, M.L. Caldeira, W. Ferreira and T.L. Davenport

Full access

Rolston St. Hilaire and Carlos A. Fierro Berwart

The effects of 1H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), cutting position on stock plants, the date of propagation, the type of rooting substrate and temperature on rooting of mussaenda (Mussaenda erythrophylla Schumach. & Thonn. `Ashanti Blood' and `Rosea', and Mussaenda philippica A. Rich `Aurorae') stem cuttings were determined. Cuttings of `Ashanti Blood' produced the largest number of roots when treated with 15 mmol (3000 ppm) IBA and rooted in perlite at 29 °C (84 °F). Cutting position on stock plants did not affect rooting in any of the three cultivars. Propagation date and temperature of the rooting medium affected root numbers in `Aurorae'. With `Rosea', only the type of rooting substrate affected root number. Rooting percentage was 22%, 48%, and 39% in `Ashanti Blood', `Aurorae', and `Rosea' respectively. After 30 days of propagation average root length was 4, 12, and 4 mm (0.2, 0.5, and 0.2 inch) in `Ashanti Blood', `Aurorae', and `Rosea' respectively. Growers must determine precise rooting conditions for each cultivar to obtain consistent rooting of cuttings. This process may not be economically feasible on a commercial basis because rooting percentages are relatively low. We conclude that other methods of clonal propagation need to be evaluated before uniform rooted stem cuttings of mussaenda can be produced economically.

Full access

Eugene K. Blythe and Jeff L. Sibley

‘Dwarf Burford’ holly (Ilex cornuta ‘Dwarf Burford’) is a significant nursery crop and is widely used in landscapes in U.S. Department of Agriculture hardiness zones 7 to 9. Stem cuttings can be rooted at multiple times during the year, provided cutting wood is sufficiently mature, with auxin treatments traditionally used to encourage rooting. This study was conducted to determine if auxin treatment could be eliminated, thus reducing labor and chemical requirements in the cutting propagation process. In three experiments, terminal stem cuttings of ‘Dwarf Burford’ holly were taken in winter, prepared with and without use of a basal quick-dip in an auxin solution, and rooted in a warm, high-humidity environment. Rooting percentages for nontreated cuttings and cuttings treated with 2500 ppm indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) + 1250 ppm 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) were similar, while treatment of cuttings with 5000 ppm IBA + 2500 ppm NAA resulted in a decrease in rooting percentage. The number of primary roots and total root length were similar among the three treatments, except in one experiment where total root length was greater with auxin-treated cuttings than with nontreated cuttings. Initial shoot growth responses were variable among the three experiments. The treatment of cuttings with auxin was not required for successful rooting and can be eliminated from the process for winter stem cutting propagation of ‘Dwarf Burford’ holly.

Free access

Judith Corte-Olivares, Gregory C. Phillips and S.A. Butler-Nance

Full access

Eric B. Bish, Daniel J. Cantliffe and Craig K. Chandler

A greenhouse hydroponic system, which uses suspended plastic troughs, was found to be an efficient system for the production of high quality strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa) plantlets. In this system micropropagated mother plants of `Oso Grande' and `Sweet Charlie' produced an average of 84 and 80 daughters per mother plant, respectively, in 1996, at a plant density of 3 mother plants/ft2 (32 mother plants/m2). Nearly 100% of the plantlets harvested from the system were successfully rooted in plug trays, and showed no symptoms of leaf or crown diseases.

Free access

Christopher J. Currey, Veronica A. Hutchinson and Roberto G. Lopez

Cuttings of herbaceous annual bedding plants must be rooted in late winter and early spring when ambient outdoor photosynthetic daily light integrals (DLIs) are at seasonally low levels. We evaluated the effect of DLI during root development on growth, morphology, and quality of nine popular vegetatively propagated annual bedding plant species. Cuttings of Angelonia angustifolia Benth. ‘AngelMist White Cloud’, Argyranthemum frutescens (L.) Sch. Bip. ‘Madeira Cherry Red’, Diascia barberae Hook. f. ‘Wink Coral’, Lantana camara L. ‘Lucky Gold’, Nemesia fruticans (Thunb.) Benth. ‘Aromatica Royal’, Osteospermum ecklonis (DC.) Norl. ‘Voltage Yellow’, Scaevola L. hybrid ‘Blue Print’, Sutera cordata Roth. ‘Abunda Giant White’, and Verbena Ruiz ×hybrida ‘Aztec Violet’ were harvested and propagated in a glass-glazed greenhouse with 23 °C air and substrate temperature set points. After callusing (≈5 mol·m−2·d−1 for 7 days), cuttings of each species were placed under one of three different fixed-woven shade cloths providing ≈38%, 61%, or 86% shade or no shade with 16 h of supplemental light for 14 days. There were no clear trends across species for stem length in response to DLI. Stem caliper of Argyranthemum, Diascia, and Nemesia increased by 35%, 119%, and 89%, respectively, as DLI increased from 1.2 to 12.3 mol·m−2·d−1. Depending on species, total, shoot, and root dry mass increased by 64% to 465%, 50% to 384%, and 156% to 1137%, respectively, as DLI increased from 1.2 to 12.3 mol·m−2·d−1. The quality index, an objective, integrated, and quantitative measurement of rooted cutting quality, increased for all species by 176% to 858% as DLI increased from 1.2 to 12.3 mol·m−2·d−1. Our results indicate that providing a DLI of ≈8 to 12 mol·m−2·d−1 after callusing increases both growth and quality of rooted cuttings.