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Shinsuke Agehara and Daniel I. Leskovar

Vegetable transplant production in high-density plug trays can induce excessive stem elongation as a result of shade avoidance responses ( Marr and Jirak, 1990 ; Smith, 1994 ). The resulting spindly transplants are generally considered unsuitable

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Ajay Nair, Mathieu Ngouajio and John Biernbaum

-based amendment produced healthy tomato transplants from direct seeding if incubation of the amended medium occurred for 1, 2, or 3 weeks. Koller et al. (2004) used several plant- and animal-based fertilizers for vegetable transplant production and recommended

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Shinsuke Agehara and Daniel I. Leskovar

Vegetable transplants grown for commercial producers need an ideal size to minimize damage during shipping and transplanting operations and to enable successful establishment in the field ( Agehara and Leskovar, 2015 ). However, vegetable

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Danielle D. Treadwell, George J. Hochmuth, Robert C. Hochmuth, Eric H. Simonne, Lei L. Davis, Wanda L. Laughlin, Yuncong Li, Teresa Olczyk, Richard K. Sprenkel and Lance S. Osborne

greenhouse organic production. Most trials have focused on organic vegetable transplant production; only one could be found that used culinary herbs ( Succop and Newman, 2004 ). The systems and media used in experiments include rockwool slabs, perlite frames

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Bridget K. Behe, Patricia Huddleston and Lynnell Sage

potential customers to attract them to the products offered by horticultural professionals. Do younger potential consumers view the branded herb and vegetable transplants in the same way as Baby Boomers? Literature Review Branding. A brand, as defined by the

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Smiljana Goreta, Daniel I. Leskovar and John L. Jifon

pepper (cv. Tiburon; Sakata Seed America, Morgan Hill, CA) were sown in peat-lite mix (Speedling, Sun City, FL) and covered with a thin layer of medium-grade horticultural vermiculite. Seedlings were grown in trays (South Cross Vegetable Transplants

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Fairuz A. Buajaila, Pinki Devi and Carol A. Miles

-scale producers of grafted vegetable transplants use controlled environments to heal newly grafted plants, small-scale growers are using simple healing chamber structures within a greenhouse, where it can be difficult to precisely control environmental factors

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Joyce G. Latimer

Mechanical conditioning is an excellent means of regulating the growth of vegetable transplants and some ornamental bedding plants. It improves the stature, appearance, handling characteristics, and overall quality of treated plants. The application procedures reported for transplants have included wind, shaking, brushing, and more recently impedance; all of which result in physical displacement of the growing points. Brushing has been most commonly studied for mechanical conditioning in high density transplant production. Brushing reduces plant height, increases stem and petiole strength, improves insect resistance in the greenhouse, tends to improve stress tolerance and enhance stand establishment in the field, and has no effect on crop yield. Although growers using the technique have been very pleased with the quality of brushed vegetable transplants, widespread commercial application of brushing is limited by a lack of automation.

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Michael A. Schnelle, B. Dean McCraw and Timothy J. Schmoll

Height control for vegetable transplants has become challenging with the loss of the industry standard growth regulator, daminozide (Alar). One alternative to growth regulators—brushing—was conducted on two cultivars of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. Five weeks of brushing twice daily resulted in height suppression for both tomato cultivars. Brushing treatments were performed successfully by use of a grower-designed apparatus constructed from readily available materials.

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William B. Evans and Margaret McMahon

There is significant interest in using non-chemical methods to control seedling height in vegetable transplant production. One method being evaluated is the use of greenhouse films that filter signifcant amounts of far-red light from ambient light, resulting in shorter tranplants. This study was undertaken to evaluate fruit yield and quality of field-grown tomatoes produced from seedlings grown under light-filtering plastics. Tomato seedlings were grown under clear polyethylene tents or light-filtering laminate tents in a polyethylene-covered Quonset greenhouse in northern Ohio. Standard 288 deep plug trays, filled with MetroMix 360, were used. Seedlings were placed under the tents at the cotyledon stage and transplanted 28 days later. Once in the field, they were grown as staked plants under open conditions using locally accepted horticultural practices. Differences in seedling height were detected within a few days after being placed under the tents. Compared to those grown under clear polyethylene tents, seedlings grown under the light-filtering plastic increased in height more slowly and were shorter at transplanting. At harvest, within each of the three cultivars tested, no significant differences in fruit number, yield, or mean fruit size were found between treatments. It is inferred that this non-chemical method for reducing vegetable transplant height may be a viable production option in the future.