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Gerardo H. Nunez, James W. Olmstead and Rebecca L. Darnell

Vaccinium has not been quantified. Southern highbush blueberry, like all cultivated blueberry, is adapted to acidic soils ( Coville, 1910 ; Finn et al., 1993 ) and experiences iron deficiency when grown in higher pH soils ( Gough, 1997 ). On the other hand

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Huan-Ying Yao, Ren-Shih Chung, Sheng-Bin Ho and Yao-Chien Alex Chang

capacity) is much lower than that of sphagnum moss, whereas bark has a similar air-filled porosity (20%; Nelson, 2003 ) as sphagnum moss. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of sphagnum moss, which ranges from 26 to 120 meq/100 g as the pH of the substrate

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James E. Altland, James C. Locke and Charles R. Krause

and found that ammonium leaching decreased proportionally to increasing CEC of the amendment. Cation exchange capacity is also related to pH buffering, as many of the cation exchange sites are pH dependent ( Helling et al., 1964 ). Argo and Biernbaum

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Ben A. Faber, A. James Downer, Dirk Holstege and Maren J. Mochizuki

offered to private individuals by state cooperative extension offices). Cost for laboratory analysis for NO 3 , P 2 O 5 , and K 2 O was $20 plus $10 for pH per sample at the time of study (Agriculture and Natural Resources Analytical Laboratory, University

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Shengrui Yao, Steve Guldan, Robert Flynn and Carlos Ochoa

exhibit leaf chlorosis in high-pH soils ( Luby et al., 2003 ; Renquist and Hughes, 1985 ). Research on strawberries in high-pH soil conditions is limited ( Renquist and Hughes, 1985 ; Rowley et al., 2010 ; Zaiter et al., 1993 ) and some of the older

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Luis A. Valdez-Aguilar, Catherine M. Grieve, James Poss and Michael A. Mellano

saline irrigation waters with and without pH control on growth, quality, resprouting ability of the tuberous roots, and nutrient concentration of ranunculus plants cultivated in sand cultures. Materials and Methods Ranunculus ‘Yellow ASD’ and ‘Pink CTD

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Holger Weichert, Stefanie Peschel, Moritz Knoche and Dieter Neumann

, the most information is available on FeCl 3 . The data demonstrated that decreased water uptake is related to decreased permeability of the polar pathways ( Weichert and Knoche, 2006b ), which most likely results from a pH-dependent precipitation in

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Michael R. Evans, Brian E. Jackson, Michael Popp and Sammy Sadaka

extracted using a vacuum. The pH was determined using a pH meter (Accumet model AB 15; Fisher Scientific, Pittsburgh, PA), and the EC was determined using an EC meter (model 441; Corning, Corning, NY). The ammonium (NH 4 + ) was determined by the

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Avner Silber, Alexander Ackerman, Boris Mitchnick, Ruth Ganmore-Neumann and Jaacov Ben-Jaacov

The objectives of the present research were to study the effects of pH, NH4:NO3 ratio, and P concentration in the nutrient solution on development of Leucadendron R. Br. `Safari Sunset' [L. salignum Bergius × L. laureolum (Lam.) Fourc.]. The experiment was conducted in aero-hydroponic systems and involved six treatments in a nonfactorial design: two pH levels (5.5 and 7.5), two P levels (7 and 20 mg·L–1), and two NH4:NO3 ratios (60:40 and 25:75). The pH of the root environment was the most important factor controlling growth. Root cells were longer in plants grown at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.5, but width was not affected. Altering the NH4:NO3 ratio did not affect development regardless of pH. Increasing the P concentration from 7 to 20 mg·L–1 significantly decreased root fresh weight at the low pH and slightly reduced shoot growth. Nitrogen, P, K, Zn, and Mn concentrations were higher, while that of Fe was lower in plants grown at low pH. Reducing the NH4:NO3 ratio did not affect N concentration but increased P and K concentrations in the shoots. Increasing the P concentration significantly raised the P content of shoot and root tissues but reduced the content of Fe, Zn, and Mn.

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Paul R. Fisher, William R. Argo and John A. Biernbaum

Substrate pH must be carefully managed to control nutrient availability in container substrates ( Peterson, 1981 ). A number of factors that include substrate components, limestone type and rate, the irrigation water source (IWS), plant species, and