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Rachel Mack, James S. Owen, Alex X. Niemiera and Joyce Latimer

Negative environmental impacts resulting from nursery and greenhouse production practices are major concerns to producers in the mid-Atlantic and southeast United States because of potential future regulation impacting crop production and

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Jennifer H. Dennis, Roberto G. Lopez, Bridget K. Behe, Charles R. Hall, Chengyan Yue and Benjamin L. Campbell

The $147.8 billion U.S. green industry includes nursery and greenhouse producers, landscape service providers as well as wholesale and retail distributors ( Hall et al., 2006 ). The wholesale value of plant production by nurseries in the top 17 U

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Thomas M. Sjulin

produced in high-elevation nurseries in northern California and southern Oregon and are transplanted as fresh-dug plants into the fields in late autumn. In the Watsonville/Salinas district, the state's largest commercial production area, the day

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S. Christopher Marble, Amy Fulcher and Richard Karel

challenges for the audience, particularly so for nursery crop producers. The need for growers to leave their daily activities and varying production schedules makes it difficult to select a time when all industry members can be present. Traditional programs

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Thomas Graham, Ping Zhang, Youbin Zheng and Michael A. Dixon

In many of the world's largest greenhouse and nursery production regions, irrigation water supply (quality and quantity) and management have become significant operational barriers. Increasingly restricted water supplies, coupled with the perennial

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Susmitha Nambuthiri, Robert L. Geneve, Youping Sun, Xueni Wang, R. Thomas Fernandez, Genhua Niu, Guihong Bi and Amy Fulcher

Large-scale container-grown nursery plant production began in the early 1950s and helped to diversify the nursery industry. Most of the clay, recycled metal, and wooden containers initially used in nurseries were replaced by plastic containers in

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Ursula K. Schuch, Jack J. Kelly and Trent Teegerstrom

Container plants, especially those in 1-gal or smaller containers, are a perishable commodity when on display in the retail nursery. From the time of delivery by the wholesaler until purchased by customers, plants need to be maintained in good

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Sarah A. White

concentration of nutrients in container nursery (crops produced in open systems, without permanent cover) effluent can range from 0.1 to 135 mg·L −1 nitrate-nitrogen (NO 3 -N) and 0.01 to 20 mg·L −1 phosphate-phosphorus (PO 4 -P) ( Huett et al., 2005 ; Taylor

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Oleg Daugovish, Mark Bolda, Sukhwinder Kaur, Maren J. Mochizuki, Daniel Marcum and Lynn Epstein

Each year, California strawberry nurseries transplant “mother” plants into 1,000 ha to produce over one billion runner plants (daughters) for either out-of-state sale or for 15,620 ha of California fruit production, valued at ≈$1.8 billion ( Calif

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Heping Zhu, James Altland, Richard C. Derksen and Charles R. Krause

There are over 1400 liner nurseries in the United States with over $395 million in sales in 2009 [ U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 2010 ]. In this production system, small liners (3- to 20-inch tall) are densely planted at a rate of 7000 to