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Common hops ( Humulus lupulus ) used in brewing are typically of European genetics and cultivated between latitudes 45°N to 50°N ( Dodds, 2017 ). Lesser studied, neomexicanus hops ( H. lupulus var. neomexicanus ) are native to the western United

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Many native and ornamental grasses can provide year-long beauty and interest including autumn and winter ( Plowes, 2012 ) to residential, business, municipal, and natural landscapes. They can be used as specimen plants; accent plants; or for

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Over the past 10 to 20 years, production of prevariety germplasm of native wildflower seeds has risen dramatically in response to the demand for site- or regionally specific ecotype seeds for roadside plantings as well as for ecological restoration

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Hundreds of perennial plant species native to the midwestern United States have potential as ornamentals, but information on how best to use such plants in the landscape remains scarce. Many horticulturists are looking for species that perform well under low-maintenance conditions and that also attract and benefit desirable fauna, such as butterflies and birds. While many of our native plants may fit into this category, not all such species will meet aesthetic criteria for home landscapes. Some native species respond to seasonal changes in temperature and rainfall by browning or going dormant. Others have very specific site requirements for moisture, soil, and humidity that may be difficult to meet in an urban landscape, or their size, growth habit, or other characteristics may make them aesthetically undesirable in the typical home landscape. This study evaluated the performance of 67 plant taxa native to the midwestern United States selected for their promising potential in a low-maintenance landscape situation.

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Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens. Douglas W. Tallamy. 2007. Timber Press, Inc., Portland, OR. 288 pages, with illustrations. $27.95, Hardcover. ISBN-13:978-0-88192-854-9. Bringing Nature Home is the first

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al., 2000 ). Limited information is available on salt tolerance of woody landscape species native to the southeastern United States ( Jordan et al., 2001 ; Wu et al., 2001 ). Previous evaluation of salt tolerance of woody landscape plant species

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Conventional wisdom suggests that only introduced species can be invasive and that indigenous species cannot be classified as “weeds” because they belong in their native range. Therefore, most weed ecology and management research is focused on non-native

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foliage ( Guilford and Smith, 1959 ; Iles and Vold, 2003 ) are also highly desirable. Native intermountain western United States deciduous tree species offer a potential pool of plants for ornamental landscape use, but assessing and selecting desirable

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use and energy savings in extreme climates ( McFarland, 2017 ; Timur and Karaca, 2013 ; van den Berg and van den Berg, 2015 ), but there is a need to increase the set of native plants with potential to be used in green vertical structures and

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recommendations for using native plant species increase ( Southeast Exotic Pest Plants Council, n.d .), it is possible that this planting technique could be used to successfully establish native shrubs in a variety of landscapes. The objective of this study was to

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