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Christopher Parry and Bruce Bugbee

concentration in agricultural field soil solutions, which is typically less than 0.07 mmol·L −1 (2 mg·L −1 ). Increasing the concentration of chelated Fe [e.g., ethylenediamine-N, N′-bis (EDDHA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and

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Sergio Jiménez, Jorge Pinochet, Anunciación Abadía, María Ángeles Moreno and Yolanda Gogorcena

tolerant plant genotypes ( Jolley et al., 1996 ) that must be confirmed later in field conditions. Several studies to select new genotypes tolerant to iron chlorosis in woody plants have been based on the root capacity to reduce Fe-chelates ( Dell'Orto et

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Brandon R. Smith and Lailiang Cheng

moisture and low soil temperature ( Davenport and Stevens, 2006 ). When Fe is limiting, dicotyledons can facilitate Fe uptake by acidifying the rhizosphere to increase Fe solubility and exuding organic acids and phenolics to chelate Fe ( de Vos et al

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Liping Kou, Tianbao Yang, Xianjin Liu and Yaguang Luo

Ca lactate and chlorine wash treatments of fresh-cut lettuce and carrots during storage at 4 °C over 10 d and found that there was no significant differences between treatments. Ca AA chelate formulations represent another Ca source that has been used

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Joseph P. Albano and William B. Miller

Irradiation of FeDTPA-containing nutrient solutions by a fluorescent plus incandescent light source resulted in the loss of both Fe-chelate and soluble Fe, the formation of a precipitate that was composed mostly of Fe, and a rise in pH. The rate of Fe-chelate photodegradation in solution increased with irradiance intensity and with solution temperature under irradiation, but irradiance had the greater effect. Fe-chelates absorb in the blue and UV regions of the spectrum. Removal of these wavelengths with a spectral filter eliminated photodegradation. Chemical name used: ferric diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (FeDTPA).

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Rebecca L. Darnell, Bruno Casamali and Jeffrey G. Williamson

). Table 1. Dry weight of ‘Sharpblue’ southern highbush blueberry grown for 16 weeks in sand culture with ammonium (NH 4 + ) vs. nitrate (NO 3 − ) nitrogen. High soil pH also decreases iron availability in the soil and decreases activity of ferric chelate

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S. Laywisadkul, C.F. Scagel, L.H. Fuchigami and R.G. Linderman

mechanical removal of leaves and the use of chemical sprays [e.g., chelated copper ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (CuEDTA)] that result in early abscission of leaves, usually while the leaves are still green. Chemical-induced defoliation of deciduous trees

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Richard J. Heerema, Dawn VanLeeuwen, Marisa Y. Thompson, Joshua D. Sherman, Mary J. Comeau and James L. Walworth

through soil fertilizer application and a number of published studies have shown promising options ( Fenn et al., 1990 ; Núñez-Moreno et al., 2009a , 2009b ). We began a long-term experiment in 2011 to evaluate the use of soil-applied EDTA-chelated Zn

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Chenping Xu and Beiquan Mou

) total antioxidant capacity, ( B ) ferrous ion chelating ability (FICA), and ( C ) reducing power 4 weeks after treatment. The values are means of eight replicates ± se . FICA was calculated as the absorbance difference ( A ) between control and sample

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Jose Reynaldo A. Santos and Frank J. Dainello

One-year old `Coho' spinach seeds (Spinacea oleracea L.) were primed, air-dried, and germinated for 12 days to determine the effects of multi nutrient liquid chelate compound (Crop-Up) and its single nutrient chelate components on the germination performance of old seeds. Treatments consisted of Crop-Up, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, and B chelate solutions at concentrations of 5, 0.25, 0.11, 0.28, 0.25, 0.34, 0.10, and 0.05%, respectively. Distilled water was used for the check. Crop-Up-, Fe-, Zn-, and Cu-priming significantly increased both seedling fresh and dry weights, and improved seed germination by 23 to 32% over the check treatment. Al1 nutrient treatments, except Cu, had a delaying effect on time of emergence. Fe-, Zn-, and Cu-priming treatments increased germination performance index by 21, 11, and 9%, respectively.