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Arthur Villordon and Christopher Clark

The anatomy of the root system in West Indian sweet potato ( Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) cultivars Ann. Bot. 37 633 643

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Desmond G. Mortley, Douglas R. Hileman, Conrad K. Bonsi, Walter A. Hill and Carlton E. Morris

Ann. Bot. (Lond.) 48 727 731 SAS Institute 2009 SAS user’s guide. Statistics, version 9.2 edition. SAS Institute, Cary, NC Wilson, L.A. Lowe, S.B. 1973 Quantitative morphogenesis of root types in the sweetpotato [ Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] root system

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Steven M. Todd, Van-Den Truong, Kenneth V. Pecota and G. Craig Yencho

. Honda, T. 1992 Chemical structures of two anthocyanins from purple sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas Phytochemistry 31 2127 2130 Philpott, M. Gould, K.S. Lim, C. Ferguson, L.R. 2004 In situ and in vitro antioxidant activity of sweetpotato anthocyanins J. Agr

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Xiang Wang, Ramón A. Arancibia, Jeffrey L. Main, Mark W. Shankle and Don R. LaBonte

Sweetpotato [ Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] is an important crop in developing countries and has many uses, ranging from consumption of fresh roots or leaves to processing into animal feed, starch, flour, candy, and alcohol. In the United States, it

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Peter B. Ojong, Victor Njiti, Zibao Guo, Ming Gao, Samuel Besong and Sandra L. Barnes

.X. Terahara, N. Yamakawa, O. 2003 Potential chemopreventative properties of anthocyanin-rich aqueous extracts from in vitro produced tissue of sweetpotato ( Ipomoea batatas L.) J. Agr. Food Chem. 51 5916 5923

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Julio Solis, Arthur Villordon, Niranjan Baisakh, Don LaBonte and Nurit Firon

sweetpotato J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 138 1 7 Eguchi, T. Yoshida, S. 2008 Effects of application of sucrose and cytokinin to roots on the formation of tuberous roots in sweetpotato [ Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] Plant Root 2 7 13 Ekanayake, I.J. Dodds, J.H. 1993

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Nenita V. Desamero and Billy B. Rhodes

Vitrification, a physiological disorder characteristic of in vitro grown plants, was observed in single-node cultures of sweet potato in mannitol-enriched medium during their second year of storage. Vitrified or vitreous sweet potato plantlets were watersoaked, translucent or glassy in appearance, with thick, swollen, leaves and stems, stunted shoot growth and poor root growth. These plantlets were not able to regenerate normal plants when transferred into fresh regeneration medium nor were they able to survive outside culture conditions.

Electron microscopy revealed changes in the ultrastructures of vitrified sweet potato plantlets. Vitrified plants had defective stomatal complex, starch grain-filled chloroplasts, disrupted cell wall, big air spaces (lacunae), high frequency of cell membrane separation from the cell wall, nuclear disintegration, and cytoplasmic disorganization. These changes in the internal structures of vitrified plants were reflected in their abnormal morphology and physiology.

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Victor A. Kahn, C. Stevens, T. Mafolo, C. Bonsi, J.Y. Lu, E.G. Rhoden, M.A. Wilson, M.J.E. Brown, K. Kabwe and Y. Adeyeye

TU-82-155 and `Georgia-Jet' early maturing. `Carver II', TU-1892 and `Rojo-Blanco' late maturing sweetpotato, cultivars were evaluated in the field for 0.20 and 40% vine removal (VR) at 8 wk after transplanting. Parameters measured were: leaf area index (LAI) recovery, net assimilation rate, foliage crop growth rate (FCGR), storage roots crop growth rate (RCGR). alpha a (the mean relative growth rate in dry wt to the mean relative growth rate in leaf area over a time interval) or the partitioning of assimilates, total and marketable yield. A split. splitplot design was used and plants were sampled at 3 and 8 wk following VR. Except for TU-82-155 all cultivars showed significant LAI recovery above the control at 3 and 8 wk after vine removal when 20% of the vines were removed while at the 40% VR, only 'Georgia-Jet'. TU-1892 and 'Carver II' showed significant increases in LAI for the same periods. Net assimilation rate showed significant interactions while FCGR was not significantly affected by either 20 or 40 VR compared to the control at 3 or 8 wk after VR. RCGR was significantly affected by both levels of VR at 3 and 8 wk after VR and surplus assimilates (alpha a) showed significant interactions between cultivars and % VR. Told yield declined for all cultivars irrespective to maturity groups with the sharpest decrease being at the 20% VR. All cultivars except TU-82-155 showed a decrease in marketable yield, the increase in marketable yield of TU-82-155 was due to a lower non-marketable yield.

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Nenita V. Desamero and Billy B. Rhodes

Vitrification, a physiological disorder characteristic of in vitro grown plants, was observed in single-node cultures of sweet potato in mannitol-enriched medium during their second year of storage. Vitrified or vitreous sweet potato plantlets were watersoaked, translucent or glassy in appearance, with thick, swollen, leaves and stems, stunted shoot growth and poor root growth. These plantlets were not able to regenerate normal plants when transferred into fresh regeneration medium nor were they able to survive outside culture conditions.

Electron microscopy revealed changes in the ultrastructures of vitrified sweet potato plantlets. Vitrified plants had defective stomatal complex, starch grain-filled chloroplasts, disrupted cell wall, big air spaces (lacunae), high frequency of cell membrane separation from the cell wall, nuclear disintegration, and cytoplasmic disorganization. These changes in the internal structures of vitrified plants were reflected in their abnormal morphology and physiology.

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V. A. Khan, C. Stevens, J. Y. Lu, M. A. Wilson, J. E. Brown, E. G. Rhoden, T. Mafolo and M. K. Kabwe

TU-155 and Georgia-Jet early, TU-1892 and Carver late maturing sweet-potato cultivars. were evaluated in the field to determine the effect of flower removal (FR) would have on marketable storage, root numbers and yield. Other parameters measured were leaf area and numbers, plant fresh and dry weight. Plants were sampled at 57 and 71 days after transplanting (DAT). All flowers were hand removed and the 1st harvest began 45 days DAT for the early and at 60 DAT for the late maturing cultivars. All flower harvests concluded 22 days after 1st harvest began and roots were harvested 120 DAT. There was significant differences among cultivars for total flower production with N-1892 and Georgia-Jet having the highest flower production. FR treatments for N-155 and Georgia-Jet showed significant increases for plant dry weight, leaf area and numbers 71 DAT while Carver and TU-1892 showed no significant differences for the same sample period. Marketable root numbers were not significantly affected by FR but marketable yields for all cultivars were. Overall, the cultivars showed variation both within and among maturity groups in their response to FR treatments, for example N-155 had a 39% compared to 3% increase for Georgia-let while Carver had a 15% increase in marketable yield compared to 5% for TU-1891.