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Increasing urban problems in regards to people and plants suggest consideration of a new emphasis in urban horticulture. This article is based on a talk presented by F. O. Lanphear at a symposium entitled “Urban Ecology Today” at the AAAS meetings in Chicago, Illinois in December, 1970.

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, shrubs constitute a very large proportion of the green infrastructure in urban environments and should merit a substantial research focus, especially toward site-specific guidance for selecting the correct shrubs for a particular site, that is currently

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Council, 2008 ). Commonly used techniques to manage urban stormwater include sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDSs), low impact development (LID), and best management practices (BMPs). SUDS focus on replicating natural systems to manage urban

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Root-zone temperature (RZT) of 15 landscape planting sites in a metropolitan area was monitored from 13 June to 5 Sept. 1985. RZT was highest at urban sites associated with city surface materials, such as asphalt and concrete. The RZT was significantly lower at suburban and woodland sites. Temperature was uniform throughout the root zone at sites along urban streets; it decreased with increasing depth at all other sites. High temperature extremes may contribute to the decline of landscape plants at urban sites.

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enabled the construction of the chinampas. Their development was linked to high regional population density and the growth of sizable local urban communities. Forced labor imposed by the governing elite to produce surpluses was a further trigger of

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The negative effects of the urban situation on human well-being are well documented, contribute to stress, weaken coping skills, and evoke a negative self-appraisal from residents continually surrounded by bleak settings (Stainbrook, 1973). The following research suggests that urban residents may visit public gardens as a means of coping with the stresses of city life. Results of a survey of urban visitors to two urban public gardens indicate that stress reduction is an important reason for visiting the gardens. The research also indicates a trend of reduced levels of self-perceived stress after a garden visit.

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Urban pest management is a “can of worms.” Depending upon who is asked, it may encompass all forms of pests in an urban environment, it may be biological control of insects in an urban area, or rodent and insect control in an inner-city area.

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ideal candidates for planting in typically low soil moisture conditions found in the urban environment ( Abrams, 1990 ; Osuna et al., 2015 ; Sjöman et al., 2018 ). Oaks are commonly a major component of urban forests across eastern North American

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al., 2018 ; U.S. Geological Survey, 2014 ). However, these strategies do not ensure long-term relief for water shortages; in fact, the effect on reducing the water demand has a limit, especially in urban areas where the population is rapidly growing

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During the last few years only a few species have been regularly used in the European urban landscape [i.e., herbaceous species or evergreen shrubs such as cotoneaster ( Cotoneaster spp.) and honeysuckle ( Lonicera spp.)], but many other species

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