Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 153 items for :

Clear All
Author:

Hurricane Irma’s passage through the study site on 11 Sept. 2017 (maximum wind speed of 81.54 km·h −1 ). This was assessed by counting the number of trees in each row exhibiting large (15.24 cm diameter) broken limbs and or tree loss and dividing that number

Free access

harvest was completed. Moreover, during 2004, several hurricanes (Category 2 or higher before landfall) passed through the location. Hurricanes Charley, Frances, and Jeanne caused leaf damage and defoliation at all three orchard locations. These storms

Free access

industry received a severe setback with the hurricane of 1916 and the damaging cold temperatures of 1917 ( Shamel, 1921 ; Vosbury and Robinson, 1929 ). Based on a survey by Dr. O.F.E. Winberg, there were reportedly 942,765 satsuma trees in Alabama in 1918

Free access

expand their market to horticultural industries. Other sites included woodyards (lumber, fuelwood, etc.) and operations processing mixed material (salvage from trees damaged in hurricanes or mixed tree species cleared from a site that was not under

Free access

Abstract

‘Shasta’ chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat) showed less SO2-induced leaf necrosis than ‘Hurricane’. The growth retardant a-cyclopropyl-a-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-5-pyrimidine methanol (ancymidol) at 0.16 and 0.48 mg ai/2.5 cm pot reduced SO2 damage on both cultivars. There was positive correlation between stomatal activity (water diffusion resistance) and degree of leaf necrosis from SO2.

Open Access

Producers of perishable commodities periodically experience natural disasters. Growers in Dade County, Fla., have suffered losses from hurricanes, freezes, and floods. Public agencies and grower groups are often asked to provide immediate estimates of loss to both official sources and the news media. Following the Jan. 1997 freeze, a method was developed to provide this information within 1 day of the disaster. This has also been used to estimate job losses for agricultural workers.

Free access

Coleus were trialed for landscape performance during 2003 and 2004 at Burden Center in Baton Rouge, La. This included a mid-spring through fall evaluation in 2003 and a spring through summer and summer through fall evaluation in 2004. Over 45 cultivars, including the Solar, Hurricane, Stained Glassworks, and Aurora series, were evaluated. Visual quality ratings were taken twice monthly and included compactness, foliage color, uniformity, and overall aesthetics. Flower observations were noted. Beds were located in full sun and consisted of a raised row of an Olivier silt loam soil. Plants were drip irrigated as needed to prevent stress. A separate study compared sun and shade (60%) performance of Kong coleus cultivars in the late summer through fall 2004. The Solar series performed well in 2003 and 2004, and generally had visual quality ratings signifi cantly greater than cultivars in the Hurricane, Stained Glassworks and Aurora series. Height was also greater in the Solar series. The Hurricane series had signifi cant flowering early in the evaluation periods, although `Louise' was slower to fl ower than `Benji' or `Jenni'. Kong coleus cultivars in 60% shade were about 50% shorter than those in full sun. `Aurora Black Cherry' was superior to the other cultivars in the series in terms of visual quality and slowness to fl ower. `Mississippi Summer Sun' (a/k/a Razzle Dazzle) and `Red Ruffle' were top performers among the nonseries cultivars evaluated.

Free access